What makes more sense, someone help me! [Trollville]

Josh Clarke
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What makes more sense, someone help me! [Trollville]

Okay, so I don't know what I want to do in the future, or what I should study in college.

 

I'm really into physical fitness, (i'm currently an uncertified personal fitness trainer, going to get certified through ACSM soon), if I go though with this I will end up probably doing sports medicine or physical therapy.

 

I also LOVE physics, biology, AND chemistry. I love math. I just don't see a huge career demand for physicist, and everyone in my stupid ass theist family keeps telling me there is no demand for scientist (but this can't be true, logically if you have to go to college for 8-10 years for something, then you will be needed by someone and they will pay you good). Someone give me some job ideas that physics, chemistry, or biology degrees would get me.

 

I know this has nothing to do with religion, so it's in the trollville Laughing out loud

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Renee Obsidianwords
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What about a medical

What about a medical career...but specialize in human physiology?

Dont know if there is such a thing or what it is called......

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ronin-dog
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I'm in Australia, so I don't

I'm in Australia, so I don't know about pay conditions or employment opportunities over there. The best thing is to do your research. Look for job adverts, call universities and anywhere you can think of that may have the jobs you are looking for. You may even find some people who are willing to talk (possibly even meet) with you and tell you their perspective on their chosen career. Remember though that each person has their own point of view and experience. In Australia science doesn't get paid well enough, but I am making a reasonable living (I am a medical scientist in private clinical pathology) and it is interesting. I could earn more working for the government, but their clinical labs are a bit more like factories.

My lab is fun and full of good, interesting people.

Good luck, whatever you decide.

Zen-atheist wielding Occam's katana.

Jesus said, "Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division." - Luke 12:51


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You know you could have

You know you could have posted this in the "General" section? There's plenty there (and other places, even) that has nothing to do with religion. Trollville is meant for the threads that have no value at all. Not a mod but I know this from being here.

Matt Shizzle has been banned from the Rational Response Squad website. This event shall provide an atmosphere more conducive to social growth. - Majority of the mod team


greek goddess
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Renee Obsidianwords

Renee Obsidianwords wrote:

What about a medical career...but specialize in human physiology?

Dont know if there is such a thing or what it is called......

Just wanted to add that this possibility is feasible.

At least at my university, all bio majors have to choose to concentrate in one of six areas: biochemistry, genetics & molecular bio, evolutionary & developmental bio, human bio, physiology, or.. something else that escapes me right now. Anyways, point is, maybe you could choose to concentrate in this area by taking classes that focus on it.

And btw, there is lots of demand for any kind of scientist. You could go into medicine, or be a researcher for any number of fields (which is the career I hope to pursue).. if you like physics you could be a particle physicist or something. Just trust me, there's lots of demand.


shelley
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you could teach.

you could teach.


Tilberian
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Advice from guy who has

Advice from guy who has changed careers a couple times and still manages to pay the bills: do NOT base your decision on what you think the market will be for the training you receive. The market is not the point. Spending your life doing what you like to do is the point.

People get paid and make lucrative careers doing all kinds of pointless shit. Some people are paid ludicrous sums of money for painting, for god's sake. Or playing a sport. Or cooking. Anything that you want to do, if you like it and do it well, can be turned into a career that will make you enough to stay alive. Since working at a job that is not enjoyable to you almost defeats the purpose of staying alive, I would say that having a job you like is priority number one.

Ask yourself what you would do if money were no concern and you just had to fill time in a day. Leave out partying with your friends and having sex because, as compelling as those things seem at certain points in your life, they do get old. What are your actual interests that are different from your friends'?

Now find a way to do that and make money from it.

Lazy is a word we use when someone isn't doing what we want them to do.
- Dr. Joy Brown


greek goddess
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Tilberian wrote:do NOT base

Tilberian wrote:

do NOT base your decision on what you think the market will be for the training you receive. The market is not the point. Spending your life doing what you like to do is the point.

I agree with everything you said - just wanted to say that the reason I pointed out the demand for scientists was because Josh's family was trying to dissuade him from a scientific career by saying that there is no demand, when this isn't true.

I second the notion that it is important to do what you want to do, and not to simply aim for a lucrative career. Josh had expressed an interest in the sciences, so I was simply trying to encourage him to pursue that route if he wanted.

 

 

Just to drive the point home with some personal experience - I'm pursuing research because it's what I am  most passionate about. I attend a university that is currently ranked 14th nationally, and I'm pursuing a biology degree. It's a very competitive environment, and most of my peers in the biological sciences are aiming to become doctors and surgeons at top med schools. Research has a stigma as being a pursuit that ranks lower than becoming a medical professional - even though both require approximately the same amount of schooling.

I came into college having decided several years beforehand that I wanted to do scientific research. However, I quickly got lumped in with the pre-med crowd, and started doubting my goals. I felt that I should be trying for med school and trying to be something "better" than a researcher. For a year and a half, this caused a lot of stress, to the point where I was suffering from panic attacks.

But after reassessing my goals, I realized that I don't really want to go to medical school. If I were to go, it would be for the purpose of impressing others, and not for my own personal gain. I thought long and hard about it and realized that I really am better suited for a research career, which is probably why I'm drawn to it. I have an inquisitive nature, and I'm good at catching details. As a kid, when all the other kids on the block were playing cowboys & indians in the summer, I was digging up grubs, collecting leaves, and putting insects in jars to create a "nature museum." I was the only 8-year-old I knew that analyzed bugs under magnifying glasses and read about human anatomy for fun. I'm also proficient in writing and I'm a good public-speaker, which are useful skills for grant-writing and presenting. And of course, I love science in general. I'm going to be starting work in a research lab in the near future, which I'm very excited about.

 

The point I'm trying to get across is this: assess your interests, skills, goals, and determine what you think you can handle (both academically and professionally). It's also good to think about if/when you might want to find a spouse, have kids, etc. The good thing about science is that it's a broad field, so there is probably some sub-interest or career path that will fit your criteria. And if you decide it's not for you, you can always keep it up as a side-interest/hobby. Anyways, hope some of the advice & suggestions on this thread will help.