Questions for Theists

magilum
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Questions for Theists

I've assembled some questions that have occurred to me at various times conversing with theists. I don't post this with the intent of debating these points, but for better understanding the range of perspectives represented in theistic beliefs. Please disregard any question not applicable to your belief system, or better explain briefly why it isn't.

Questions for theists:

  1. When did you become a believer?
  2. Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?
  3. If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?
  4. Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?
  5. Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?
  6. Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?
  7. Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?
  8. If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?
  9. If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?
  10. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?
  11. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?


Eloise
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When did you become a

When did you become a believer?

I was probably about 17ish. I originally believed, somewhat strictly, out of curiosity. Theology makes promises of enlightenment, freedom, truth and such. and, of course, the asking price for such life adventures is a leap of faith, so I took it, and believed, in particular in the specific tenets "seek and ye shall find, ask and ye shall recieve".  



Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

 Yes. i'm not sure how to qualify that, though I think I should do just to be clear. I studied indeed, and intensely also, but I didn't think to be told what to study or how to study it. And I think this is important in that it goes to my first answer. In my curiosity I chose to trust something, that contract was between me and god, if god himself couldn't justify it to me I was not going any where else for backup. 

 

If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?

This applies to me somewhat, I think. and I would say, not yet, not quite.

 

Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?

(although this is only applicable in a small way to my beliefs I will answer) No it isn't. And because is : I think it's made abundantly clear in the second half of that book there is only one reasonable prescription for behaviour. 

 

 Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

 No.

 

Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

 No I don't. See - my answer to the first two questions.

I have additional points to make here though about the meaning of the word faith. Faith is purported to acheive ends. For example, a mustard seed of faith to move a mountain. There is an interesting paradox at work here, faith is supposed to do miracles, if it doesn't then it's not faith - that is contingent. If it does, then it is by nature non-contingent. Fascinating no? Okay, so before Todangst comes down here with the logical equivalence of a sledgehammer I had better get that to make some sense. It really is simple, either faith is the equivalent of a property intrinsic to the psyche or it's impossible. (and note that is not at odds with theology since psyche and soul are ancient synonyms). If some non-contingent property of the psyche can construct from a contingent set, one outcome then in our world there must be some evidence in our world of blind experiments with prodigious outcomes. Oh... that's right, there is.

 

Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

Yep, yep, yep, yep.

 And before someone debates me, please note that my definitions of these are far less anthropomorphic, in the classical sense, than yours probably are.

 

If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?

 Answering this question would take all week. Suffice it to say My world, my life and I are on personal terms.

 

If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?

 Now I sort of believe in evolution, not insofar as being the origins of life.  The description I would give: it is valid exploration of the human state.  

 If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?

 No. I don't support apologetics. 

 If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?

ID might have the potential to raise the general level of cognisance in religious consciousness.  I guess.

 

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Cpt_pineapple
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magilum wrote:  When did

magilum wrote:

 When did you become a believer?

 

 

I was Christian until High School, then atheist, then about a year ago, my current beliefs. 

 

Quote:

Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

 

 

 

 Somewhat. Some study is needed to justify it.

 

 

Quote:

 Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

 

Not really, but if people ask I usually respond Christian. 

 

Quote:

 Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

 

No, it could change. 

 

Quote:

 Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

 

I'm not sure about the omniscient. The others yes, but depending on the defenition. 

 

Quote:

If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)?

 

Science. 


Quote:

What convinces you of its/their existence?

 Science and wonder.


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totus_tuus
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Quote: When did you become

Quote:
When did you become a believer?

I was raised Catholic.  Pretty serious about until my late teens, then felll away from religion atogether.  I became pretty agnostic, lenaing toward a vague acknoledgement of some sort of deity.  I spent about 20 years like that.  As a result of a kinda "spritual awakening", I started experimenting with religions, Quaker (because my wife was, oddly enough since she was married to a soldier), Presbyterian (mostly as a compromise with her so that we could worship together).  I reaized all along that neither one really satisfied what I really believed.  The Presbyterians, I think, actually dreaded me coming to Bible study, because they knew I was haulign my Catholic views around with me still.  After her death, I returned to Catholicism.

Quote:
Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

Yeah.  I really gave Cavinism a try, but found it wanting before my reversion to Catholicism.

Quote:
If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?

By water and the Spirit in infancy. 

Quote:
Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?

No...and yes.

First, no.   With the coming of Christ, the Law of Moses was abrogated even for the Jewish people. Jesus "canceled the bond which stood against us with its legal demands; this he set aside, nailing it to the cross" (Col. 2:14). Paul tells us that we must " let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a sabbath. These are only a shadow of what is to come; but the substance belongs to Christ" (Col. 2:16).  Rather than fulfilling the Law of Moses, Paul points us toward fulfilling the Law of Christ: "To those outside the [Mosaic] law I became as one outside the [Mosaic] law—not being without law toward God but under the law of Christ—that I might win those outside the [Mosaic] law" (1 Cor. 9:21). He wrote also, "Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ" (Gal. 6:2).

Now, yes.  The Roman Catechism explains it thus, "The other Commandments of the Decalogue are precepts of the natural law, obligatory at all times and unalterable. Hence, after the abrogation of the Law of Moses, all the Commandments contained in the two tables are observed by Christians, not indeed because their observance is commanded by Moses, but because they are in conformity with nature which dictates obedience to them.

"This Commandment about the observance of the Sabbath, on the other hand, considered as to the time appointed for its fulfillment, is not fixed and constant, but changeable, pertaining not so much to mores but to ceremonies. Neither is it a principle of the natural law; we are not instructed by nature to give external worship to God on that day, rather than on any other. And in fact the Sabbath was kept holy only from the time of the liberation of the people of Israel from the bondage of Pharaoh."

Quote:
Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

Take a guess.  LOL

Quote:
Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

I'm not sure I understand he concept of contingent and non-contingent beliefs.

Quote:
Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

Don't forget transcendent, but yeah.

Quote:
If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?

I experience my God through prayer, particularly through prayer in the sacrifice of the Mass and in the presence of Jesus in he Blessed Sacrament.  I practice the Carmelite form of sprituality taught by St Teresa of Avila and St John of the Cross and followed by St Therese of Lisieux and St Edith Stein.  This involves emptying one's self of attachment to creatures and reaching a state of contemplative prayer, that is being able to enter directly into the presence of God through prayer.

As for the existence of God, the traditional Thomistic proofs work well for me.  Perhaps it's just the effects of my mind disorder, but many of the attempts to argue around, or through Aquinas reasoning by atheists seems like semantic gymnatics.  Ol' Tom did a pretty good job, I think.

Quote:
If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?

I'm just fine with evolution.

 

Quote:
If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?

If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?

I'm gonna my response to these questions to expand some on my beliefs on Creation.

I think that regardless of the time period, whether seven days or 15 billion years, the universe in which we live is awesome and miraculous. Believers must realize that the Scriptures are not a science text, nor did the writers ever intend them to be.  The point of the Creation accounts is to teach that God was the originator of the universe.  He intended its existence.  Humanity (and probably any other rational life forms who could possibly existing in it) are pinnacle of His creation, are especially designed by Him. 

 

 

 

"With its enduring appeal to the search for truth, philosophy has the great responsibility of forming thought and culture; and now it must strive resolutely to recover its original vocation." Pope John Paul II


Suriel
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I don't remember not


  1. I don't remember not being a believer, and my memory stretches to me being 3 years old (although it is obviously patchy!). I sewed up a lot of loose threads aged approximately 22.
  2. I did read a few books aged 22 which enabled me to consolidate my various thoughts and theories into something that made sense to me.
  3. I dislike the connotations of the phrase "born-again" and don't consider myself to have been.
  4. No. Why? Because it's an extremely old fictionalised history of a people who lived in a different world from the one I live in.
  5. No. I see no need to pigeon-hole myself.
  6. It isn't for me as it makes sense.
  7. No.
  8. I don't "experience" my god. I think God is rather beyond human comprehension. What makes me believe? Logic.
  9. I believe in evolution. I think not to believe in evolution is pretty foolish given the evidence. However also think SOMETHING caused the Big Bang and created what was there before.
  10. You can't predict future discoveries. Could anyone 100 years ago have predicted the internet?
  11. As yet there is no convincing scientific theory as to the origin of the materials that comprise the universe, or to what caused the Big Bang.

 

"Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose." (Kris Kristofferson)


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Suriel wrote:

Suriel wrote:
As yet there is no convincing scientific theory as to the origin of the materials that comprise the universe, or to what caused the Big Bang.

I'm nitpicking here because of your usage of the word convincing. What do you mean? Convincing for you? Convincing for the majority of the scientific community? Convincing for a Christian?

Because, yes, there is a convincing scientific theory as to the origin of the materials that comprise the universe, or to what caused the Big Bang.

Edit: By convincing, I mean for the scientific community.

Edit Edit: Please guys, lets keep it on topic. I would really hate to see this thread turn into a discussion about origin. I am simply curious as to what he means by convincing. Laughing


Suriel
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CrimsonEdge wrote: I'm

CrimsonEdge wrote:

I'm nitpicking here because of your usage of the word convincing. What do you mean? Convincing for you? Convincing for the majority of the scientific community? Convincing for a Christian?

Fair nitpick, I do like to play with words. I should have said "scientific proof" perhaps (although scientists used to believe in phlogiston, right?)

As I understand it there is only speculation as it relates to the 'Augustinian era' and no scientific consensus.

"Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose." (Kris Kristofferson)


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1. I was raised Catholic,

1. I was raised Catholic, but we were "Easter/Christmas" Catholics. When I started dating my (now) wife, I went to her church (charismatic/evangelical/"seeker" ). There, I "asked Jesus into my heart". A couple years later, I realized I was a false convert, and had never been a Christian. That was two years ago.

2. During my time as a false convert, I worked very hard to be a "proper" believer. It was during this time that I came to a proper understanding of the Gospel. I wouldn't describe this as "necessary". I would call it, "the hard way" Smiling

3. ~30

4. No, the Old Testament was given to the nation of Israel. The New Testament fulfills the Old, and is better.

5. Yes (non-denominational, Bible-based Christian)

6. No. My belief is based on "trust". Trust that God keeps His Word.

7. Yes

8. I experience God primarily through reading the Bible. Any other experience must be viewed in light of what is spelled out in the Bible.

9. I learned evolution in my Catholic high school. Since coming to a right understanding of God, my "faith" (trust) in evolution has been damaged. Evolution can mean different things to different people. I believe micro-evolution is undeniable. My main concern is with "common descent" from a single organism.

10/11. Ultimately, creationist efforts are a form of apologetics.


jmm
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When did you become a
  1. When did you become a believer? November 18th, 1997.
  2. Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs? No, the whole thing sort of just happened. I grew up in a Baptist church where my grandfather was the pastor and my father was a sunday school teacher. At the time of my conversion I had rejected all of that, though. I won't get into details, but the way in which I perceive the world was changed drastically in a very short period of time and apart from anything to do with religion. I have since undergone a long period of intense study, though, and I have been slowly moving away from Christianity and theism as a result. This period of doubt and transition began in February of 2001.
  3. If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again? 18.
  4. Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why? No, because it is a collection of suspicious documents that were written by a bunch of primitive screwheads.
  5. Do you consider yourself a member of a religion? Not anymore. They sort of ran me off. 
  6. Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why? No. It has been fading for about 7 years.
  7. Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent? No to all four. My conception is clouded by temporality and finitude.
  8. If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence? Mainly through dreams and reveries, but more recently through reading the New Testament in the original Greek. Also, in an odd way, through the love of a particular female.
  9. If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is? I do believe in evolution as it was taught to me in a college-level biology course, and I must say that it has been one of the main blows to my Christian view of the world - primarily the point that Homo sapiens are working towards extinction just as ever other species has and will.
  10. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses? They're not very scientific, in my opinion.
  11. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have? N/A

magilum
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mouse
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nedbrek wrote: 6. No. My

nedbrek wrote:

6. No. My belief is based on "trust". Trust that God keeps His Word.

 what would be an example of God not keeping his word?  what could God do to break this trust?

Ethics and aesthetics are one
-Wittgenstein


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totus_tuus

totus_tuus wrote:

Quote:
Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

I'm not sure I understand he concept of contingent and non-contingent beliefs.



I think this question means, is there anything that would cause you to change your beliefs in/of (I guess in your case) the Catholic Church, or of God in general; are your beliefs contingent upon requirements being met by the Catholic Church/God?

Please correct me if I've got the meaning wrong;

Ethics and aesthetics are one
-Wittgenstein


magilum
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[bump] Thanks for indulging

[bump]

Thanks for indulging me. I appreciate the responses so far. 


magilum
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Crap, we lost some in the

Crap, we lost some in the crash.
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a seeker
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Got some fresh theist chub

Got some fresh theist chub for you right here. Be gentle, i'm new.

BTW i REALLY hate being called a theist rather than a Christian. It's like being called a european instead of English. Accurate but vexing 

When did you become a believer?

 Bout 7 years ago


Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

 I would'nt really say intense study. Some. But it was pretty peripheral

If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?

22ish 

 
Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?

 No. Because much of it is at odds with the NT. And because there are places where the NT specifically superceeds the OT. THerefore i presume a progression of morality parallelling the development of society.

Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

 

Bit. Ish. Some days. Mainly not.
Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

Sorry, don't understand the question.


Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

 

Yes, yes, yes by definition and yes but only after some thought
If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?

 

Looooong story. A combination of a perception in my subconcious, a consistancy with some elements of the bible (yes, some, not all, have fun with that), and a load of other stuff i shan't bore you with.


If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?

 

NA. I beleive in evolution
If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?

 

They are not scientific theories. As i suspect you know you scamp.
If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?

See above.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Can i ask you one back?

 

Is the support of RRS for you or anyone, mainly based in the approval of atheism, or the disapproval of religion. What is the motivator for you?


totus_tuus
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Is it just my imagination,

Is it just my imagination, or do we keep losing posts?


wavefreak
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totus_tuus wrote: Is it

totus_tuus wrote:
Is it just my imagination, or do we keep losing posts?

 

Server crashed again. 


thetempleofman
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Questions for theists:

Questions for theists:

  1. When did you become a believer?

I grew up in a family that had mixed feelings about religion. Mom loved church and dad hated going but was still a believer until his late 30’s. I was introduced to many churches in my pre-teens and finally made the decision on my own, against my families wishes, to join the LDS (Mormon) church. I would say that is when I truly became a believer.

  1. Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

I wouldn’t call it an intense study. I did have to have the missionaries to my home for several lessons to teach me things I didn’t know and to ask me if these things felt right to me. I was NEVER pushed into the church or into religion. It was done by choice.

  1. If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?

I believe that you can only be “born again” once. That is when you first choose to be baptised. I chose that at the age of 13. Partaking of a sacarament is the renewal of those baptismal covienants, therefore you do not need to be baptised “born again” over and over.

  1. Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?

As a Christian, when Christ died, he took on all the sin of the world; making each of us automatically forgiven if we ask for forgiveness to Heavenly Father. The Ten Commandments are guidelines so to speak. There is only one prescription for behavior and we all know the famous line “What Would Jesus Do?”.

  1. Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

Absolutely.

  1. Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

Yes I do. Faith has been around since the beginning of man. Whether it be in religion or not. Do you not have faith getting on an airplane that you will safely arrive to your destination or that the medical doctor performing surgey on you today will do his job correctly and you will wake up healthier than before? Having faith is more than just a religious concept.

  1. Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

My Heavnely Father (I say mine, because, everyone believes differently) is a wonderful man. He is here whenever I need him. He sees everything I do and keeps an eye on things. He has endless and undieing power over all living things. To answer your question – He is omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent and benevolent.

  1. If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?

I experience my Heavenly Father through many things. Reading scripture, prayer, family gatherings, church, faith, love…the list can go on. I KNOW he is with me always because I can feel it in my heart. If you’ve ever felt that warm tingle within your chest and became overwhelmed by something so great, that is HIM.

  1. If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?

I believe in both evolution and creationism. Call me weird but it is possible for both to be. Things do evolve over time. However, no one KNOWS how the evolution process works or why it happens. There may be many theories but we’ll only know how to prove those theories right or wrong through studying, praying and having faith in your beliefs. I know that each human being has a soul and was given by only Him. God created everything. I believe that with all my heart.  There is a wonderful article called “Seek Ye Diligently” by George R. Hill III. You can see the article here: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db010VgnVCM1000004d82620aRCRD&locale=0&sourceId=42849209df38b010VgnVCM1000004d82620a____&hideNav=1

 

  1. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses? If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?

I’m going to agree with totus_tuus on these two questions.

Quote:
I think that regardless of the time period, whether seven days or 15 billion years, the universe in which we live is awesome and miraculous. Believers must realize that the Scriptures are not a science text, nor did the writers ever intend them to be.  The point of the Creation accounts is to teach that God was the originator of the universe.  He intended its existence.  Humanity (and probably any other rational life forms who could possibly existing in it) are pinnacle of His creation, are especially designed by Him. 

Well said totus_tuus!

.::Proud to be an American Christian::.


totus_tuus
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templeofman
  1. templeofman wrote:
    Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?
I’m going to agree with totus_tuus on these two questions.
Quote:
I think that regardless of the time period, whether seven days or 15 billion years, the universe in which we live is awesome and miraculous. Believers must realize that the Scriptures are not a science text, nor did the writers ever intend them to be.  The point of the Creation accounts is to teach that God was the originator of the universe.  He intended its existence.  Humanity (and probably any other rational life forms who could possibly existing in it) are pinnacle of His creation, are especially designed by Him. 

 

Well said totus_tuus!

Thanks, Temple.  Just to set the record straight, I'm firmly in the 15 billion year camp.  One of the most destructive ideas to come out of the Reformaton is the whole idea of sola scriptura.  It's obviously a broken concept.  Where faith and reason clash, there is something wrong with our interpretation of the faith, and we need to examine our theology, not deny the science.

BTW, your post on your marriage quandry is quite interesting and touching.  I pray for you daily.

"With its enduring appeal to the search for truth, philosophy has the great responsibility of forming thought and culture; and now it must strive resolutely to recover its original vocation." Pope John Paul II


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Quote: 1. When did you

Quote:

1. When did you become a believer?

Past few months.

Quote:

Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs?

Very. I was a strong atheist for some time before having personal experiences which are not easily explainable without some kind of God.

Quote:

If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again?

18

Quote:

Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why?

Yes and no. 10 Commandments are a go, but the rest of it is laws made by the Israelites trying to interpret the 10 laws.

Quote:

Do you consider yourself a member of a religion?

Not necessarily.

Quote:

Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why?

No. One must have a reasonable faith, not a blind one.

Quote:

Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?

Omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent, but not necessarily omnipresent.

Quote:

If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence?

Through prayer. The answer of said prayers, some immediately.

Quote:

If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is?

I don't mind evolution, I do realize I will get my but kicked by DG if I go on a crusade against it. I see no problem with it in relation to a God, and people are stupid to relate evolution to atheism.

Quote:

If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?

Possibly the rapture (or such events as described in the Bible), or some way of God giving us irrefutable evidence of His existence.

Quote:

If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have?

None really, if one believes that the world was created we get no scientific value out of it, nothing to be applied to the world other than the fact that we were created.


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Sorry it took me so long to

Sorry it took me so long to do this Magillum.  Here are my answers

Questions for theists:

  1. When did you become a believer?  Eh, somewhere in high school.  Can't say there's a defining moment.
  2. Was a period of intense study needed prior to a transition into, or affirmation of, your beliefs? well... needed, no... but I did study intensely on my own to affirm the question of belief that I had.  I ultimately came to the conclusion through years of study and contradicting arguments that the followers of Christ had more logical/scientific/ and historically accurate conclusions.  There was more than just my studies that brought me to my following.  God invaded my life in amazing ways!
  3. If applicable, at what age(s) were you born again? not applicable
  4. Is the Old Testament still a prescription for behavior? If not, why? The old t. shows us the character of God. In the sense that it tells us what God is like and we want to be more like Him it prescribes behavior.
  5. Do you consider yourself a member of a religion? no
  6. Do you consider faith a non-contingent belief? If not, why? Faith and belief must work hand in hand or they're not real
  7. Is your concept of a god or gods omniscient? omnipresent? omnipotent? omnibenevolent?  There is only one God, the most high.  He is All knowing, All Caring, he is love.  He is always good.
  8. If applicable, how do you experience your god(s)? What convinces you of its/their existence? When I pray, we talk.  He answers.  I feel his presence at times.  I've also seen his actions played out around me.
  9. If you don't believe in evolution, can you give a brief description of what it is? I do believe in evolution, however, what point will there be for me to explain it to you?
  10. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what future evidence can we expect to reinforce their hypotheses?  While it is true that some people believe in Christianity and therefore Creationism as a means of obtaining "fire insurance," a belief that something will happen in the future can not provide evidence concerning our origins.
  11. If you consider Creationism/Intelligent Design scientific theories, what potential applications do they have? The fact that I believe affects my view of life in every way.  There is more to life than just what we can see with our eyes.

 


Religious_Rebel
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1)  All my life I've been

1)  All my life I've been one.  My parents brought us to church a handful of times but not very much at all.  I didn't know much of Jesus until high school but I always believed in God.

2) No not really.

3) I was born again when I got experience in the ghetto.  Opened my eyes to see people suffer like they do for no good reason.

4) I enjoy Psalms and writings of that nature, but whatever contradicts loving thy neighbor I just ignore.

5) Not really, I like what I can take from each religion.  I was going to be a theologian and still may be.

6) I believe God is much better than what we imagine.  I have faith that there is an afterlife where all of us will have the opportunity to make up for lost worship so to say.   I wish I could phrase that better.

7) I believe in one God.  YHWH, Yahaveh, Jehovah...  Whatever you wish to call Him.  I believe all of those things, perhaps not so much benevolence for beings like the devil which unfortunately I believe in. >< 

Cool Again I'll bring up the ghetto.  I had lots of enlightening experiences there...  Aside from that, I'd rather not get too personal on this question.  What convinces me there is a God is the beauty of the earth and also the injustice men create.

9)  I believe in evolution but always wonder how something as smart as us could evolve like we have in such a short period of time.   I'm sure this is something that many of you think about as well, maybe you can enlighten me on this.

10) I want to cry and laugh at the same time when I hear people mention creationism.  Intelligent Design isn't nearly as bad in my mind.  I believe that God has given us many bounties here on earth but I believe in evolution.  There's a few things I could name, like the fact that our livestock animals are seemingly defenseless.  I own chickens; they're the dumbest things I've ever seen, and roosters hate each other so much..  It's very confusing to perceive how they existed in the wild.

11) I'm still on the fence about intelligent design.  We are (I perceive anyways) very lucky to have what we have.  In all honesty I'm just confused about the way we've made it where we've made it to.   Seems too epic and magnificent to be possible.

 

I hope I answered your questions to your liking. Smiling

It is said the great ones catch teardrops in their hands.