Activist Showing Banned Rape Film in India

harleysportster
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Activist Showing Banned Rape Film in India

 

Apparently the ban on the film for possible "increase of tensions" is not slowing down it being shown 

 

www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-31865477

 

ndian police have opened in inquiry into an activist who showed a banned BBC film on the 2012 Delhi gang rape in the slum where the rapists lived.

Ketan Dixit projected the film, India's Daughter, on to sheets in front of 50 people in Ravidas Camp.

It is the second time in recent days Mr Dixit has publicly screened the film.

Police obtained an injunction on the documentary, which features an interview with one of the rapists, over claims it could inflame tensions.

Rapist Mukesh Singh, who along with three others is facing the death penalty for the crime, expressed no remorse in the interview, and blamed the victim for fighting back.

The film-makers have dismissed the concerns.

Appeals against the ban are due to be heard next Wednesday.

'For our own good'

Mr Dixit told BBC Hindi that he wanted to "show such films in rural areas as only popular Bollywood films reach people living there".

Delhi police official Rajan Bhagat said "any screening of the film of the film is illegal", and the police had initiated an investigation into the incident.

Reports say more than 50 residents of the Ravidas Camp slum watched the film, which was shown using a projector linked to a laptop.

"We thought the screening of the film might disturb the camp," an unnamed resident told the Indian Express newspaper.

"Later, we were convinced that it was for our own good and that even our children should watch the film."

However, some people left half-way through, complaining that the film was in English and they could not understand it.

Why did the Indian government ban the BBC rape documentary?

That's a question India's leaders must be asking themselves a week on from the ban.

If the idea was to stop people talking about the film, it has backfired in a big way.

India's Daughter has been front page news here in India every day since the ban was imposed late on Tuesday last week.

It has been trending on social media and has been the subject of characteristically vigorous debate on India's array of current affairs chat shows, with pundits jabbing angry fingers at each other into the night.

So why did the government do it?

There is certainly a political component to the ban. Permission for the interview was granted under the previous Congress-led government. The ruling BJP will have wanted to distance itself from that decision.

Misguided

It also wanted to be seen to be acting swiftly as controversy around the film blew up.

And the decision to ban the film was widely supported initially.

In the first couple of days after the ban even some leading Indian feminists supported it, arguing that the rapist should not be given a platform to express his repellent views.

Since then support has weakened and the consensus now, certainly in India's newspapers, seems to be that the ban is misguided.

The initial grounds for the ban were that broadcast of the film - or more precisely the interview with one of the men convicted of the savage rape and murder of a young Indian woman on a Delhi bus - could threaten public order.

The comments the rapist makes are certainly incendiary. Mukesh Singh appears to show no remorse for his crime and seems to be suggesting that, by fighting back, his victim was responsible for her own murder.

Some commentators have suggested that there is a link between elevated tensions around the issue of rape and the lynching of a rape suspect in the state of Nagaland in the north east of India.

It is a controversial claim. Vigilante justice is not uncommon in India, particularly over emotive crimes like rape.

 

“It is proof of a base and low mind for one to wish to think with the masses or majority, merely because the majority is the majority. Truth does not change because it is, or is not, believed by a majority of the people.”
― Giordano Bruno


butterbattle
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Quote:If the idea was to

Quote:
If the idea was to stop people talking about the film, it has backfired in a big way.

India's Daughter has been front page news here in India every day since the ban was imposed late on Tuesday last week.

Lmfao. Without the Indian government, very few people in that country would have watched this documentary.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/streisand-effect

They were the biggest promoters, supporters, and publicists of this film. Stupid politicians, god bless them. 

Our revels now are ended. These our actors, | As I foretold you, were all spirits, and | Are melted into air, into thin air; | And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, | The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces, | The solemn temples, the great globe itself, - Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, | And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, | Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff | As dreams are made on, and our little life | Is rounded with a sleep. - Shakespeare


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 India has it's growing

 India has it's growing pains.  It is still coming out of the middle ages.  They are still arguing and going through social uphevals on such things as arranged marriages and adapting to modern ways of thinking.  That is not me talking, I have friends who are from India and have told me that.  


iwbiek
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Burnedout wrote: India has

Burnedout wrote:

 India has it's growing pains.  It is still coming out of the middle ages.  They are still arguing and going through social uphevals on such things as arranged marriages and adapting to modern ways of thinking.  That is not me talking, I have friends who are from India and have told me that.  




that's all true, but india is still the most democratic country in south and central asia.

"I have never felt comfortable around people who talk about their feelings for Jesus, or any other deity for that matter, because they are usually none too bright. . . . Or maybe 'stupid' is a better way of saying it; but I have never seen much point in getting heavy with either stupid people or Jesus freaks, just as long as they don't bother me. In a world as weird and cruel as this one we have made for ourselves, I figure anybody who can find peace and personal happiness without ripping off somebody else deserves to be left alone. They will not inherit the earth, but then neither will I. . . . And I have learned to live, as it were, with the idea that I will never find peace and happiness, either. But as long as I know there's a pretty good chance I can get my hands on either one of them every once in a while, I do the best I can between high spots."
--Hunter S. Thompson