woot Finally decided on a political party

Shaitian
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woot Finally decided on a political party

Yep i've finally deciede which political party i am going to register with, I have thought long and hard weighed the pros and cons. This has been in the workings for 11 months now but i've finally decieded to go with the Green Party.
I am posting this for two reasons one is i wanted to know (if you feel like dislosing it) what party you all are from, though for the most part we can all guess the general direction and also i wanted to know if anyone else took this long or longer to decied what political party they were going to be a part of...?


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I don't see the benefit of

I don't see the benefit of declaring allegiance to any particular political party. If you agree with their policies at the time of an election, you can vote for them without having to make any commitment about the next time around. Therefore, the only thing you can possibly be saying by declaring allegiance is that you plan to support them no matter what. But what reason could there be for supporting a political party aside from their policies? Since the policies of parties change all the time, doesn't it make sense to stay unaffiliated between elections?

Lazy is a word we use when someone isn't doing what we want them to do.
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I will change from time to

I will change from time to time.  Currently I am a ssupporter of both the federal and provincial liberal parties.


jmm
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I'm a registered

I'm a registered libertarian and have voted as such in the past.  I'm not going to throw away anymore votes though.  At a certain point I realized that we're stuck with this republican/democrat dichotomy for the long haul, so throwing my vote to a neutered 3rd party does little more than perpetuate the delusion that I've somehow done the right thing, when in reality I'm not even really participating in the democratic process as we know it.  

I've been seriously considering re-registering as a democrat, both for practical purposes and also in light of my (obviously) evolving political views.  If Obama gets the dem nomination, I'll vote for him.  If Clinton gets it, I probably won't vote at all. 


LosingStreak06
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Tilberian wrote: I don't

Tilberian wrote:
I don't see the benefit of declaring allegiance to any particular political party. If you agree with their policies at the time of an election, you can vote for them without having to make any commitment about the next time around. Therefore, the only thing you can possibly be saying by declaring allegiance is that you plan to support them no matter what. But what reason could there be for supporting a political party aside from their policies? Since the policies of parties change all the time, doesn't it make sense to stay unaffiliated between elections?

Well, depending on where you live, your party registration makes i difference in the primaries. Most primary elections are open only to members of their particular parties, so registering as a member of a party can give you a chance to help shape (through your selection of the most ideal candidate) the direction the party will go in. If the self-described moderates refrain from registering to either major party, or to any third party, then both primary elections have results that are skewed toward the more extreme "left" and "right." This can leave the moderates a bit alienated when the general elections roll around. So I would say that the benefit of "declaring allegiance to any particular political party" is that you are granted an opportunity to excercise a certain amount of control over the party. Which is a pretty good deal when you think about it.

For example, I am currently registered as a Republican, but since McCain had pretty much locked up the nomination, and since my state doesn't hold primaries until quite late in the year, I am planning on switching over to the Democratic party since there is a chance it might not be decided by then, and I would still be able to voice some sort of opinion.


Jacob Cordingley
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Thought I'd throw in my two

Thought I'd throw in my two pence. As a member of the 51st state (or one more than the actual number of states in America) I think I should at least voice my opinion even though I can't vote.

As a socialist I would probably register for the Democrat Party, as it will be voting for the lesser of two evils. My "vote" would be for Clinton if she actually wins the primaries, since a feel she is the most left-wing person with a chance to get into power. As much as I like Mr Obama, he seems far too centrist for my tastes.

I do get the feeling though that nothing will really change. I'm quite sceptical of the sham of democracy in both Britain and America - First-past-the-post electoral systems can barely be called democratic at all and don't effect the popular vote in the slightest. Moreover, in America there are vast amounts of money thrown into electoral campaigns which just doesn't happen here, this means that the wealthiest candidates can afford the best campaigns and that the 'average Joe/ Josephine' simply cannot afford to run for President.

I do feel though, that I should have my say, since ultimately the President will have more power here than in the US, since the role gives more power over foreign policy than domestic policy.


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I registered as a Democrat a

I registered as a Democrat a few days after I turned 18 - basically I'm a democrat because that's the closest party to my views that has a chance of being elected. My actual orientation would be the liberal end of Socialism.

Matt Shizzle has been banned from the Rational Response Squad website. This event shall provide an atmosphere more conducive to social growth. - Majority of the mod team


Tilberian
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LosingStreak06

LosingStreak06 wrote:

Well, depending on where you live, your party registration makes i difference in the primaries. Most primary elections are open only to members of their particular parties, so registering as a member of a party can give you a chance to help shape (through your selection of the most ideal candidate) the direction the party will go in.

Good point. And I suppose just because you register with one party or another it doesn't mean you have to vote from their candidate. 

Lazy is a word we use when someone isn't doing what we want them to do.
- Dr. Joy Brown


darth_josh
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World Socialist Party

World Socialist Party

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Zombie
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I'm a staunch cthulluist,

I'm a staunch cthulluist, why pick the lesser of two evils?