New research supports free will, refutes determinism.

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New research supports free will, refutes determinism.

The brain-computer duel: Do we have free will?
Researchers test mechanisms involved in decision-making

Date:
January 4, 2016

Source:
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Summary:
Using computer-based brain experiments, researchers studied the decision-making processes involved in voluntary movements. The question was: Is it possible for people to cancel a movement once the brain has started preparing it? The conclusion the researchers reached was: Yes

Exerpt
If subjects are able to evade being predicted based on their own brain processes this would be evidence that control over their actions can be retained for much longer than previously thought, which is exactly what the researchers were able to demonstrate. "A person's decisions are not at the mercy of unconscious and early brain waves. They are able to actively intervene in the decision-making process and interrupt a movement," says Prof. Haynes

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160104130826.htm


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 Everyone keeps talking

 Everyone keeps talking about free will, but I never see a coupon for it in my Sunday circular.

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At least Brian didn't

At least Brian didn't attempt to make an actual contribution to this topic. I'll take a shit tier joke over an uneducated rant against strawmen.

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They had no choice about

They had no choice about changing their minds. If you believe this implies free will, then computers must also have free will because they can change a decision based on new stimulus or memory.

 

 

 

 

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EXC wrote:They had no choice

EXC wrote:

They had no choice about changing their minds. If you believe this implies free will, then computers must also have free will because they can change a decision based on new stimulus or memory.

You are wasting your breath.


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EXC wrote:They had no choice

EXC wrote:

They had no choice about changing their minds.

Ridiculous and unsupported as always.

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Free will

may depend upon one's ability to be, or use logic. Lets say that --I make a decision, but after a while I see that the decision has other options. Being I had time to analyze the info, and then found there's more to making the decision then previously seen---I find I "logically"  I would make a better decision after becoming aquainted with previously unseen or unknown facts. It may be-- that free will only goes so far most of the time. If logic intervenes then it can't be solely a matter of free will. One would have to deliberatly go against what is logical to use free will to over-ride what's logical, but that would be illogical. It seems free will relys more on not knowing facts but have to proceed regardles. Ok, so, does logic over-ride free will. Becausee it would be illogical to be lillogical when one knows one is going to do illogic. (crimony). I'm guessing we have less free will then we think we do. But again, wouldn't it depend upon education/knowing. It looks like the more one knows the less free will one has, because education has already set the path of endeaver, or narrowed decisions to what one' knows.

It may be a "toggle" situation. One may have to toggle in and out of free will as needed according to what one knows or can reason out. That would also be saying that education removes reason to think. Wow, I could really go with that one--but I'll spare everyone.

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Free will

may depend upon one's ability to be, or use logic. Lets say that --I make a decision, but after a while I see that the decision has other options. Being I had time to analyze the info, and then found there's more to making the decision then previously seen---I find I "logically"  I would make a better decision after becoming aquainted with previously unseen or unknown facts. It may be-- that free will only goes so far most of the time. If logic intervenes then it can't be solely a matter of free will. One would have to deliberatly go against what is logical to use free will to over-ride what's logical, but that would be illogical. It seems free will relys more on not knowing facts but have to proceed regardles. Ok, so, does logic over-ride free will. Because it would be illogical to be lillogical when one knows one is going to do illogic. (crimony). I'm guessing we have less free will then we think we do. But again, wouldn't it depend upon education/knowing. It looks like the more one knows the less free will one has, because education has already set the path of endeaver, or narrowed decisions to what one' knows.

It may be a "toggle" situation. One may have to toggle in and out of free will as needed according to what one knows or can reason out. That would also be saying that education removes reason to think. Wow, I could really go with that one--but I'll spare everyone.

The only possible thing the world needs saving from are those running it.

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Old Seer wrote:may depend

Old Seer wrote:

may depend upon one's ability to be, or use logic. Lets say that --I make a decision, but after a while I see that the decision has other options. Being I had time to analyze the info, and then found there's more to making the decision then previously seen---I find I "logically"  I would make a better decision after becoming aquainted with previously unseen or unknown facts. It may be-- that free will only goes so far most of the time. If logic intervenes then it can't be solely a matter of free will. One would have to deliberatly go against what is logical to use free will to over-ride what's logical, but that would be illogical. It seems free will relys more on not knowing facts but have to proceed regardles. Ok, so, does logic over-ride free will. Becausee it would be illogical to be lillogical when one knows one is going to do illogic. (crimony). I'm guessing we have less free will then we think we do. But again, wouldn't it depend upon education/knowing. It looks like the more one knows the less free will one has, because education has already set the path of endeaver, or narrowed decisions to what one' knows.

It may be a "toggle" situation. One may have to toggle in and out of free will as needed according to what one knows or can reason out. That would also be saying that education removes reason to think. Wow, I could really go with that one--but I'll spare everyone.

You are wasting your breath


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Old Seer wrote:may depend

Old Seer wrote:

may depend upon one's ability to be, or use logic. Lets say that --I make a decision, but after a while I see that the decision has other options. Being I had time to analyze the info, and then found there's more to making the decision then previously seen---I find I "logically"  I would make a better decision after becoming aquainted with previously unseen or unknown facts. It may be-- that free will only goes so far most of the time. If logic intervenes then it can't be solely a matter of free will. One would have to deliberatly go against what is logical to use free will to over-ride what's logical, but that would be illogical. It seems free will relys more on not knowing facts but have to proceed regardles. Ok, so, does logic over-ride free will. Because it would be illogical to be lillogical when one knows one is going to do illogic. (crimony). I'm guessing we have less free will then we think we do. But again, wouldn't it depend upon education/knowing. It looks like the more one knows the less free will one has, because education has already set the path of endeaver, or narrowed decisions to what one' knows.

It may be a "toggle" situation. One may have to toggle in and out of free will as needed according to what one knows or can reason out. That would also be saying that education removes reason to think. Wow, I could really go with that one--but I'll spare everyone.

You still choose whether or not to apply logic. Thus it can't be an either/or dilemma.
Also, education helps you think, not the opposite. Without an education you might think just as much, but you will be far more prone to error, making your thoughts a waste of energy.

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Ah, so.

I overlooked the decision factor to use logic. There is also training to consider. At my age I find it very difficult to change mental habits. I really have to apply "will" to change my mind on certain things. Even if I make a decision to change a thought line or application I have to do it again the next time. It doesn't stay put easily and over time it changes. I know as a kid I could change almost instantly---and it was gone. Now you know what you're in for as you get older.  Thought lines become more permenent/solid and need time to change. Also. this may give me a different (not saying I,m correct on the subject) viewpoint of free will then a younger.

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