I would bet on this CEO

Brian37
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I would bet on this CEO

http://www.king5.com/story/money/2015/04/14/seattle-company-70000-minimum-wage/25761421/

 

No I am NOT talking about everyone making 70k, I just love this guy's attitude that pay is not keeping up with the cost of living. 

And notice one of billionaires mentioned in the story who also wants pay increases for everyone. Nick Hanauer.

 

 

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Beyond Saving
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Brian37

Brian37 wrote:

http://www.king5.com/story/money/2015/04/14/seattle-company-70000-minimum-wage/25761421/

 

No I am NOT talking about everyone making 70k, I just love this guy's attitude that pay is not keeping up with the cost of living. 

And notice one of billionaires mentioned in the story who also wants pay increases for everyone. Nick Hanauer.

 

Then bet on it.... oh wait you can't.

Just goes to show that you don't have to use government guns to attempt something like this. If you did something useful with your life, you could be hiring people at $70,000 a year and showing all those terrible rich people how it is so much better. Maybe it will work great, maybe the company is out of business in a few years. The great thing about freedom is that people can do whatever fucking crazy experiments they want. 

From an investing standpoint, the thing I would be concerned about is how would the business handle a recession? You just threw away your $2 million cushion- it is easy to raise peoples wages, but they are much less understanding if you need to cut them when a couple big clients leave. It is also highly unlikely that they will be willing to put up the cash to sustain the business in bad times when it is unprofitable. So is he planning on taking on personal debt in that case? Does he have the assets to sustain it? Does he have other plans to make his employees more personally vested in the business so they might be willing to put up cash/credit in a crises? 

It is an interesting experiment, but it clearly opens your business up to a lot of exposure to an economic downturn if you don't find ways to mitigate it- everyone is out of a job completely. Maybe he has answers for these questions, maybe it will turn out to be the greatest idea since sliced bread. The difference between me and you is I happily embrace people trying out whatever crazy ideas they imagine to see if they work, while you come up with your fucked up ideas and force everyone else to do them at gunpoint.

If, if a white man puts his arm around me voluntarily, that's brotherhood. But if you - if you hold a gun on him and make him embrace me and pretend to be friendly or brotherly toward me, then that's not brotherhood, that's hypocrisy.- Malcolm X


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I can't comment because I'd

I can't comment because I'd be on the same side as Brian. He's a dumbass who has everything backwards, so it simply can't happen.

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Dane Atkinson is a tech

Dane Atkinson is a tech entrepreneur who started his first company at 17 and has run almost a dozen more since. He's so friendly that he manages to sound cheerful while explaining the art of hiring workers for as little money possible.

"I have on many occasions paid the exact same skill set wildly different fees because I was able to negotiate with one person better than another," he says.

Some employees were worth $70,000 a year, but only asked for $50,000 a year. So, he says, he paid them $50,000 a year.

This works great for the company — until the employee finds out someone else at the company with the same job is making far more. "I've seen people cry and scream at each other," he says.

After enough of those painful moments, Atkison decided that at his next company, things would be different.

Three years ago, he started a tech firm called SumAll — a tech company where all the employees know each others' salaries.

When the company first started, there were just 10 people, and they worked together to figure out what everyone would be paid. But it started to get more complicated when they started hiring new people.

Atkinson would have to sit the new candidate down and basically say: Here's what everyone gets paid.

"I distinctly remember hiring an experienced, seasoned employee who has negotiated through her career," he says. "Her response was, 'This is unfair because I can't actually negotiate ... It's a car with an actual price, versus, talk to the dealer.' "

And, of course, a company where everybody sees each other's salaries creates new kinds of tension.

Earlier this year, Chris Jadatz took over the duties of someone who'd left the company. The person who had left was making $95,000 a year. Jadatz was making $55,000. "It made me feel definitely underpaid, as if maybe I was being looked over," he says.

So Jadatz went to Atkinson, the boss, and asked for more money. He got a $20,000-a-year raise.

Atkison has meetings like this all the time. He says it gives him a chance to explain why some employees make more than others — and to explain to employees how they can make more.

For a lot of employees, knowing what everyone makes is less exciting than it seems.

I talked to the CEO of another company that's open with salaries, and he said the reaction reminds him of Americans hearing they have topless beaches in Europe. Before you go to one, you think it's just going to be the craziest thing in the world. Then you get there and it's like, OK, nobody's flipping out because people are topless here. It's just how things are.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2014/07/02/327758712/the-company-where-everyone-knows-everyone-elses-salary


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Brian37 wrote:No I am NOT

Brian37 wrote:
No I am NOT talking about everyone making 70k, I just love this guy's attitude that pay is not keeping up with the cost of living.
 

I'm curious...since you're a fan of pro football; do you think professional athletes deserve the salaries they currently earn?

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 Meanwhile, Mr. Price is

 Meanwhile, Mr. Price is being sued and was whining that his margins aren't large enough to cover the costs of the lawsuit. I wonder if any of his employees are going to donate to the legal defense fund?

If, if a white man puts his arm around me voluntarily, that's brotherhood. But if you - if you hold a gun on him and make him embrace me and pretend to be friendly or brotherly toward me, then that's not brotherhood, that's hypocrisy.- Malcolm X


zarathustra
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Brian37 wrote:Beyond Saving

 

Thank you for finally answering.  I have some difficulty squaring your response with your previous statement:

 

Brian37 wrote:
No I am NOT talking about everyone making 70k, I just love this guy's attitude that pay is not keeping up with the cost of living.

 

You seem to have no problem with the large salaries pro-atheletes draw, yet tremendous problems with the salaries drawn by CEOs; although in both cases the salaries are what the employer and employee have settled on.  

I especially have trouble comprehending your disposition, when the greedy executives with their "corporate welfare" are responsible for the football teams that you like so much, with their high-paid players.  Witness the Rams, who moved to St. Louis when offered enough perks; and are now moving back to the L.A. market; with St. Louis trying to find enough money to build them a new stadium to entice the team to stay.

There are no theists on operating tables.

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