Why I'm ashamed to say I'm a Republican

digitalbeachbum
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Why I'm ashamed to say I'm a Republican

Well for one, I no longer believe the Republican platform is my platform. The Republican party has been hijacked by fundamentalists, tea baggers and other nut sacks who think that their god rules all seen and unseen.

I also dislike what is going on in the government now that Obama has won his second term. The house leader, Boehner, is now willing to work with Obama in an attempt to save America. See the link below with what he said...

http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-pn-john-boehner-obamacare-paul-ryan-20121108,0,3036470.story

So what happened with the last four years? Where the fuck was these assholes? Doesn't this prove they "held America hostage" in an attempt to make Obama look bad? Does this prove they don't give a shit about Americans or America? Are they just self-serving, selfish, self-centered douche bags?

I think I might turn Independents. I can't switch to the Democrats, I don't follow their platform either.

 

Free will is an illusion. People always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

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Atheistextremist
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Don't beat yourself up, Dig

 

 

I used to be a Liberal (conservative) voter here in Australia but over the past 10 years the Libs went to the right - in our media's vernacular they became the 'billy' tea party. Anti women, anti immigration, anti environment, anti science and pro god. 

I now vote on the basis of policy. I get a list before an election of major party policies (not promises) and tick the ones I support. Doing this in the last election I was 60 per cent Labor (liberal social democrat workers party) and 40 per cent Green.

We have a Labor/Green coalition and an atheist prime minister so I got almost everything that I wanted, just rather watered down.  

What I was surprised by was that when I went through the process I found I supported none of the policies of the conservatives. I just never knew it until I objectively assessed policies. 

And yeah, our conservative party, (the confusingly titled Liberal Party), has deliberately tried to block everything the ruling coalition has attempted over the past few years. Party before country every time.

The leader of the opposition was called 'Dr. No' in a recent newspaper editorial. 

 

 

 

"Experiments are the only means of knowledge at our disposal. The rest is poetry, imagination." Max Planck


digitalbeachbum
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Atheistextremist wrote: I

Atheistextremist wrote:

I used to be a Liberal (conservative) voter here in Australia but over the past 10 years the Libs went to the right - in our media's vernacular they became the 'billy' tea party. Anti women, anti immigration, anti environment, anti science and pro god. 

I now vote on the basis of policy. I get a list before an election of major party policies (not promises) and tick the ones I support. Doing this in the last election I was 60 per cent Labor (liberal social democrat workers party) and 40 per cent Green.

We have a Labor/Green coalition and an atheist prime minister so I got almost everything that I wanted, just rather watered down.  

What I was surprised by was that when I went through the process I found I supported none of the policies of the conservatives. I just never knew it until I objectively assessed policies. 

And yeah, our conservative party, (the confusingly titled Liberal Party), has deliberately tried to block everything the ruling coalition has attempted over the past few years. Party before country every time.

The leader of the opposition was called 'Dr. No' in a recent newspaper editorial. 

Is the Green Party in Australia anything like the Green Party here in America or the UK?

I'm always amazed that even though the parties from other countries use the same name to describe themselves usually there is no connection.

 

Free will is an illusion. People always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

-Scott Adams


Brian37
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I think no matter who you

I think no matter who you vote for, economic issues affect all of us, and the biggest mistake was that the right was far too focused on social issues. But beyond that, what built our middle class was investment and not the casino economy it has become. You cannot let the bottom fall out and let wages drop which makes demand drop which causes loss of jobs. I get tired of the right scapegoating the working class as if they want welfare and those people who falsely cry that spend absolutely no time in those communities other than to pat them on the head like condesending narscissists.

Nowhere in the rest of the industrial west do we have such a huge pay gap. No other country spends as much on health care with the exploding cost and continuingly fewer covered. Nowhere in the west are we so far behind in education. And for the past 30 years the republicans have dominated the cure for all those ills and it has only gotten worse as a result of their propaganda.

Find me a party other than the democrats that is willing to adress those things without pushing the lower two classes down further. As far as I can tell democrats seem to be the only ones right now who are making that effort.

Libertarians have the social issues correct, but are nothing but republicans on steriods economically speeking and have an even worse "wild west" attitude on economics. Both republicans and libertarians fail to see that smaller government depends on self policing and right now, that will not work in our current climate.

Give me a party that values investment and education and a rising tide that lifts all of us. Give me a party that does not see one class as being the only class with any rights.

 

"We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers."Obama
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Atheistextremist
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The greens

digitalbeachbum wrote:

Atheistextremist wrote:

I used to be a Liberal (conservative) voter here in Australia but over the past 10 years the Libs went to the right - in our media's vernacular they became the 'billy' tea party. Anti women, anti immigration, anti environment, anti science and pro god. 

I now vote on the basis of policy. I get a list before an election of major party policies (not promises) and tick the ones I support. Doing this in the last election I was 60 per cent Labor (liberal social democrat workers party) and 40 per cent Green.

We have a Labor/Green coalition and an atheist prime minister so I got almost everything that I wanted, just rather watered down.  

What I was surprised by was that when I went through the process I found I supported none of the policies of the conservatives. I just never knew it until I objectively assessed policies. 

And yeah, our conservative party, (the confusingly titled Liberal Party), has deliberately tried to block everything the ruling coalition has attempted over the past few years. Party before country every time.

The leader of the opposition was called 'Dr. No' in a recent newspaper editorial. 

Is the Green Party in Australia anything like the Green Party here in America or the UK?

I'm always amazed that even though the parties from other countries use the same name to describe themselves usually there is no connection.

 

 

here began as a environmental movement springing out of the Franklin River protests of the early 80s. Another development from that period was the establishment of the Bush Heritage Foundation, whose goal is to privately own key wildlife assets through donation. The BHF currently owns 1 per cent of the Australian continent, a landmass almost as big as the USA but with double the coastline.  

More recently the greens are mostly controlled by inner city liberals, generally derided by the right as the 'latte set'. Some of their policies are a bit much and some I agree with - gay marriage, assisted euthanasia for people in extreme pain, higher taxes for the rich, alternative energy and so forth. Their call for blanket 36-40 per cent tax for all business is moronic, however. And I would not vote green if I thought they'd get complete control of the house. I want them to have influence, not control. 

 

 

 

"Experiments are the only means of knowledge at our disposal. The rest is poetry, imagination." Max Planck


Atheistextremist
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Agree

 

Brian37 wrote:

I think no matter who you vote for, economic issues affect all of us, and the biggest mistake was that the right was far too focused on social issues. But beyond that, what built our middle class was investment and not the casino economy it has become. You cannot let the bottom fall out and let wages drop which makes demand drop which causes loss of jobs. I get tired of the right scapegoating the working class as if they want welfare and those people who falsely cry that spend absolutely no time in those communities other than to pat them on the head like condesending narscissists.

Nowhere in the rest of the industrial west do we have such a huge pay gap. No other country spends as much on health care with the exploding cost and continuingly fewer covered. Nowhere in the west are we so far behind in education. And for the past 30 years the republicans have dominated the cure for all those ills and it has only gotten worse as a result of their propaganda.

Find me a party other than the democrats that is willing to adress those things without pushing the lower two classes down further. As far as I can tell democrats seem to be the only ones right now who are making that effort.

 

with this. Our conservatives are so clamped to fiscal policy, driven by magnates, they seem immune to the travails of the blue and white collar working classes, though in Australia our unemployment rate is only about 5.4 per cent at present. The stress here is the mountains of debt families have taken on in the competition to own a living place. I think our average house price is 450,000 and our dollar is higher than the USD. So we sort of have a debt crisis but its a personal debt crisis. You can't walk away from an indebted house here the way you can in the US. Adding a sting to this is the sale of infrastructure owned by state governments to pay of huge debts, leading to skyrocketing utilities costs from newly privatised energy companies. When people are being tortured by silly mortgages, extra bills can be the bridge too far. Not sure how we avoided the GFC so far but we somehow escaped the worst of it. Regulated banks. 

 

 

 

"Experiments are the only means of knowledge at our disposal. The rest is poetry, imagination." Max Planck


digitalbeachbum
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Atheistextremist

Atheistextremist wrote:

 here began as a environmental movement springing out of the Franklin River protests of the early 80s. Another development from that period was the establishment of the Bush Heritage Foundation, whose goal is to privately own key wildlife assets through donation. The BHF currently owns 1 per cent of the Australian continent, a landmass almost as big as the USA but with double the coastline.  

More recently the greens are mostly controlled by inner city liberals, generally derided by the right as the 'latte set'. Some of their policies are a bit much and some I agree with - gay marriage, assisted euthanasia for people in extreme pain, higher taxes for the rich, alternative energy and so forth. Their call for blanket 36-40 per cent tax for all business is moronic, however. And I would not vote green if I thought they'd get complete control of the house. I want them to have influence, not control. 

 

I thought it would be a good idea in America to do 32-34% across the board for all businesses and people. No tax deductions. Just pay 1/3 and be done with it.

I'm all for being more "green" in America, but big business prevents that from happening.

 

Free will is an illusion. People always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

-Scott Adams