Humanist Funerals

harleysportster
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Humanist Funerals

http://phys.org/news/2012-05-humanist-funerals.html

Humanist funerals

May 16, 2012

Funeral directors need to be aware of the needs of non-religious people. A unique investigation into the subject funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) provides a snapshot of a defining aspect of life - or indeed death.

 

"The issue of death is one of the most important incidents that all societies deal with," says Dr Matthew Engelke, at the London School of Economics. "I wanted to look at how, in contemporary society, people who do not believe in an afterlife are commemorated at a funeral."

To carry out the research, Dr Engelke focused on funerals provided by the British Humanist Association (BHA). "It was clear that the people who chose these funeral services were not necessarily humanists or atheists. They generally described themselves as 'non-religious', which covered the entire spectrum from absolute atheist to a more general lack of commitment or belief, especially when it comes to organised religion."

One of the most striking aspects of BHA funeral ceremonies is that they strive to be true to the individual, to reflect as best as possible the character, world views and the sensibilities of the person who has died. "The focus is almost exclusively on the person, which is often not the case with the more traditional religious ceremonies" says Dr Engelke.

This emphasis on the individual is an increasingly important phenomenon in modern Western life, suggests Dr Engelke. In many societies, and in ritual ceremonies down the ages, the place of the individual in the ritual is often the least important consideration.

In humanist ceremonies, being true to the individual is most central. Dr Engelke commonly came across family members and friends who said: "We told the funeral director John did not go to church so we did not want a vicar to take the funeral".

"This gives an intriguing glimpse into the extent to which modern citizens feel it important to express their uniqueness and individuality", says Dr Engelke.

"It is important for to look at these key moments in life, as it is through these that we get a sense of the most significant issues that matter to people and understand what it means to be non-religious in a modern British society," continues Dr Engelke. "And I think one of the best places to start is ritual services such as funerals."
 

“It is proof of a base and low mind for one to wish to think with the masses or majority, merely because the majority is the majority. Truth does not change because it is, or is not, believed by a majority of the people.”
― Giordano Bruno


Jeffrick
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Hrummph...!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

                     I always figured that since I ddin't believe in a heaven or hell I had no place to go ..........so I wasn't going.

 

 

 

 

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harleysportster
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Jeffrick

Jeffrick wrote:

 

 

 

                     I always figured that since I ddin't believe in a heaven or hell I had no place to go ..........so I wasn't going.

 

 

 

 

 

Me personally, I really don't care what they do with me when I die. I plan on probably donating my body to science if I die of natural causes. If I end up as road kill in a motorcycle wreck, they can scrape me off the road and toss me in a trash pile. I personally have never really understood the need for funerals. 

Off the topic, but I had a family member once, that had to have been one of the cruelest and meanest bastards that I ever came across ( he was thought well of in the church though). When he died, I saw the rest of my family socializing at the funeral and talking about how sad that it was that he was gone. Now, not to sound cold-blooded, but the truth of the matter was, the man was a violent, abusive, bullying, thief that would take advantage of anyone that was naive. I didn't feel any remorse when he was dead and don't now. 

I think, the whole funeral thing is way overblown. 

My dad once told me: "Once I am dead, you have done all that you can do for me, so why waste money and energy to make sure that you give me a "proper" burial ?"

 

 

“It is proof of a base and low mind for one to wish to think with the masses or majority, merely because the majority is the majority. Truth does not change because it is, or is not, believed by a majority of the people.”
― Giordano Bruno


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Social get together

I see funerals as mainly therapy for the living rather than the dead.

Also to create social cohesion so that the living will feel that their lives are valued too.

 

 


Luminon
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harleysportster wrote:One of

harleysportster wrote:

One of the most striking aspects of BHA funeral ceremonies is that they strive to be true to the individual, to reflect as best as possible the character, world views and the sensibilities of the person who has died. "The focus is almost exclusively on the person, which is often not the case with the more traditional religious ceremonies" says Dr Engelke.

This emphasis on the individual is an increasingly important phenomenon in modern Western life, suggests Dr Engelke. In many societies, and in ritual ceremonies down the ages, the place of the individual in the ritual is often the least important consideration.

What a good idea! Such funerals should be interesting, we'll learn something about the deceased one, instead just imposing the uniformous church format on the funeral. I suppose it would involve projecting some videos and photographs of the dead, speech about his character and so on. Maybe even his favorite music. In that case I'm looking forward to putting together a DJ set from my collection for the funeral. (together with some of my hypnotic visual digital works. I wonder if piety will keep people to stay through it Smiling 

Beings who deserve worship don't demand it. Beings who demand worship don't deserve it.


harleysportster
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Luminon wrote: What a good

Luminon wrote:

 What a good idea! Such funerals should be interesting, we'll learn something about the deceased one, instead just imposing the uniformous church format on the funeral. I suppose it would involve projecting some videos and photographs of the dead, speech about his character and so on. Maybe even his favorite music. In that case I'm looking forward to putting together a DJ set from my collection for the funeral. (together with some of my hypnotic visual digital works. I wonder if piety will keep people to stay through it Smiling 

 

Smiling Not a bad idea. 

“It is proof of a base and low mind for one to wish to think with the masses or majority, merely because the majority is the majority. Truth does not change because it is, or is not, believed by a majority of the people.”
― Giordano Bruno