Question for those not raised in religious homes

Bahana
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Question for those not raised in religious homes

I have been curious about this for a while. For those of you who were not raised in a religious family, did you think that gave you an advantage not having superstitious beliefs as a child? Did it help you develop critical thinking skills earlier, or did you still have some supernatural beliefs?


TonyZXT
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 I would say for me it was

 I would say for me it was a big advantage.   By the time I started attending Church youth group/bible study at 14 I was already thinking critically well enough that I don't think I could have been sucked into religion.  I wasn't aware of that at the time, and continued to go because a) it was fun (activities, cute girls etc.) and b) I was going with a close friend.  

During bible study I started to ask questions, innocently at first.  I noticed the other kids questions they were asking to understand didn't raise eyebrows, but mine did.  So I went to one of the youth pastors and told him that I was asking questions to try and understand and the other youth group leader had gotten irritated with me.  I told him that I wanted someone to help me fill in some blanks, so I asked more questions.  Some of my questions about Noah's ark apparently offended him, when he didn't have an answer.  At that point he told me I needed to go home and get a better understanding of what faith means, and yelled at me as if I was defiantly attacking his beliefs.  That was pretty much the beginning of the end for me.  I saw through exactly what was happening, whereas it took my friend many more years to leave because of his being raised in a fundie family.  Interestingly enough, he became an unabashed atheist.  I think the beginnings of that for him were the conversations we had together about trying to make sense of the bible, and how people got mad when we tried to understand.   We also talked a lot about the incredible level of hypocrisy we saw in the church.

"They always say the same thing; 'But evolution is only a theory!!' Which is true, I guess, and it's good they say that I think, it gives you hope that they feel the same about the theory of Gravity and they might just float the f**k away."


Brian37
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TonyZXT wrote: I would say

TonyZXT wrote:

 I would say for me it was a big advantage.   By the time I started attending Church youth group/bible study at 14 I was already thinking critically well enough that I don't think I could have been sucked into religion.  I wasn't aware of that at the time, and continued to go because a) it was fun (activities, cute girls etc.) and b) I was going with a close friend.  

During bible study I started to ask questions, innocently at first.  I noticed the other kids questions they were asking to understand didn't raise eyebrows, but mine did.  So I went to one of the youth pastors and told him that I was asking questions to try and understand and the other youth group leader had gotten irritated with me.  I told him that I wanted someone to help me fill in some blanks, so I asked more questions.  Some of my questions about Noah's ark apparently offended him, when he didn't have an answer.  At that point he told me I needed to go home and get a better understanding of what faith means, and yelled at me as if I was defiantly attacking his beliefs.  That was pretty much the beginning of the end for me.  I saw through exactly what was happening, whereas it took my friend many more years to leave because of his being raised in a fundie family.  Interestingly enough, he became an unabashed atheist.  I think the beginnings of that for him were the conversations we had together about trying to make sense of the bible, and how people got mad when we tried to understand.   We also talked a lot about the incredible level of hypocrisy we saw in the church.

As an aside, I noticed your sig, Thomas Jefferson never cussed in his writings, and Darwin's theory of evolution came way after Jefferson's death.

"We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers."Obama
Check out my poetry here on Rational Responders Like my poetry thread on Facebook under BrianJames Rational Poet also on twitter under Brianrrs37


Kapkao
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When I made it a point not

When I made it a point not to get caught in my parent's superstitions -they struck me as a useless waste of time I resisted at every angle- I was given the largely secular freedom to choose my own beliefs and (yes) belief system. Have a particularly potent psychological fantasy life that I (usually) keep to myself, and it helps determine my next course of action... sometimes with great (astounding, even) precision. But that is nothing more than a component of being a little more intellectually accomplished and proficient than most of my same-aged peers. (according to one test at age 8 or 9... MENSA-level intellect. Yes, it was an IQ test.)

IIRC, some of my social studies books had "Critical Thinking" skills as part of a chapter. I grasped most of them right away. I guess being a smart skeptic is one of those innate, congenital capacities of mine. My Dad encouraged skepticism, my mother encouraged self-control (but in a secular, easily frustrated and narcissistic manner.) This was a top-notch school district, you see... and it was very "redneck-punk" friendly, as well. Good schools; bad authoritorian principles and teachers. (tl:dr story)

I would say childhood environment played a pivotal role in my development of becoming a skeptic. It did not help me deal with bullies, nonconformists, and lead-headed cliques of idiots that seemed to specialize in 'intellectually barren' casual socialization largely because of me having a pacifistic non-confrontational Dad, and a perpetually irate mother who showed interest in motherhood only when it was convenient.

Now look where public schooling is now. Tennessee is passing anti-bullying laws with Repubs trying to weasel in allowances for bullying someone because of race, sexual orientation, etc. Because, if their is one thing that must be made an inalienable right... it is bullying via bigotry in the south, confirming the-already profound stereotype much of our nation and world has of us. for idiotic, sell-out "Dixiecrats"

Anyways, despite my "bitch of a mother"'s numerous actions... I was not an inherently socially-accomplished child. There's a very probable reason for that, and in modern medicine it is known as the "autism spectrum". I didn't have a language delay (I babbled as an infant), but I certainly did have all the profound personality traits of such. My mother did not use the authority of god or whatever demagogic related bs on me, so I can say I was fairly religion-free unless one of my grandmothers wanted to show me off. (Occasional, but still happened.) That sent whatever avoidance I had into overdrive in a 'keep your distance and we can be friends' sort of way.

Thus, like other "aspies", I am very much a natural-born skeptic. I personally have yet to meet an HFA or Aspie that wasn't inherently skeptical of religion and "theistards" to some extent. Alas, I am also undiagnosed, and I don't "flap hands". But I certainly have many of the traits, including things like OCD, ADHD (when it is at least 50F or warmer outside, and I have actual energy from things like reduced dopamine and seratonin uptake amounts), and a lack of a will to socialize with ingrates and "hugs and kisses" types of morbid southerners-don't-reject-the-kindness-of-strangers obesity individual. Autism, regardless of the "label", means (for me) an inability to give a shit what idiots think. As it happens, I consider myself to have inherited most of my so-called "spectrum traits" from my dad. He considers his friends his greatest asset, I am a 'if I don't like the people I am hanging out with or the people I look up to, I cut them loose'. Sign of the times, eh?

Speaking of which, I have never been able to understand why other people consider their passions and predjudices so important, when it essentially makes them irrational. This includes becoming mecurial as one of our mods did not too long ago (over a year or so) because of the thought that not all secular atheists did not share whatever "angry little man" level of ethics he had. It was basically a pre-emptive verbal attack on anyone that might have disagreed with him or not give a shit about some moral dilemma, somewhere in the world. This basically amounted to Dubya's "You are either with me, or you are with my enemies" mantra.

I adopted "harmful idiot" as my occupation as a "pisstake" in response. People can and will be rendered persona non grata, regardless of label, and regardless of whatever "club" they are members of. This certainly includes activists, as Sapient's post about CFI proves beyond a doubt. Preventing persona non grata is one thing, becoming self-righteous and mercurial towards anyone who disagrees with you is uncalled for, an anomaly amongst a site that attempt(s/ed) to promote rationality and secularism, is entirely reactionistic in choice of words, and shows poor control over one's emotions. Yes, the dictionary definition of emotions, not the "trick of language" definition of emotion Bobspence admittedly uses. I don't care for reactionists, myself. I've dealt with them all my life, and they seem to hail from older, more idealistic/histrionic generations. (No offense to cj) I make a point of questioning and challenging whatever arguments of thunderous moral authority and meaningless (a)theistic drivel they make. As a sidenote, Sapient thinks that "unity" is possible amongst atheists, eventually; I like to stand behind him, on that. But I also wonder how could atheism, secularism, etc can get past individuals like the ones I describe (where impassioned charges based on "ethics", regional culture, acedemic thinking, "philosophy" and possible differences in neurology... are unavoidable.)

Apologies for rambling, but it was necessary to explain how, exactly I became a secular individual with "critical thinking skills" no one else seems to use. That includes people who "wear their heart on their sleeve", "turn a blind eye" towards the assholes they keep company with, will not back down from whatever misguided special interests they hold. This is assuming a more secular world is not a "special interest", unless... you enjoy sharing it with kooks.

I don't.

“A meritocratic society is one in which inequalities of wealth and social position solely reflect the unequal distribution of merit or skills amongst human beings, or are based upon factors beyond human control, for example luck or chance. Such a society is socially just because individuals are judged not by their gender, the colour of their skin or their religion, but according to their talents and willingness to work, or on what Martin Luther King called 'the content of their character'. By extension, social equality is unjust because it treats unequal individuals equally.” "Political Ideologies" by Andrew Heywood (2003)


TonyZXT
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Brian37 wrote:As an aside, I

Brian37 wrote:

As an aside, I noticed your sig, Thomas Jefferson never cussed in his writings, and Darwin's theory of evolution came way after Jefferson's death.

Oops, thanks for pointing that out.  I must have not deleted that from my old quote when I changed my sig a couple weeks ago.  Guess y'all didn't know Jefferson was gangsta, huh?  lol

"They always say the same thing; 'But evolution is only a theory!!' Which is true, I guess, and it's good they say that I think, it gives you hope that they feel the same about the theory of Gravity and they might just float the f**k away."


Vastet
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I really can't say. It might

I really can't say. It might have given me an advantage, but there's nothing I can point to and say it would have been different if I were raised to believe.
I wasn't raised to disbelieve either though.

I had a couple phases where I latched onto one idea or another over the years of my youth, but I never fully embraced any until I heard the term atheist.

Proud Canadian, Enlightened Atheist, Gaming God.


Jean Chauvin
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Hi Opie

Hi Opie,

I wasn't raised in a religious family at all. My father was an alcoholic at would beat my sisters. All my family are not really Chrisitans. I'm kind of the only one who is seriously hardcore about Christianity.

But that is from the grace of God. It really matters not what situation you are in or grew up in, what matters is what God has planned for you and what His grace will allow in your circumstances. In my case, by His grace, I was saved, educated and became successful.

Respectfully,

Jean Chauvin (Jude 3).

A Rational Christian of Intelligence (rare)with a valid and sound justification for my epistemology and a logical refutation for those with logical fallacies and false worldviews upon their normative of thinking in retrospect to objective normative(s). This is only understood via the imago dei in which we all are.

Respectfully,

Jean Chauvin (Jude 3).


Brian37
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Jean Chauvin wrote:Hi Opie,I

Jean Chauvin wrote:

Hi Opie,

I wasn't raised in a religious family at all. My father was an alcoholic at would beat my sisters. All my family are not really Chrisitans. I'm kind of the only one who is seriously hardcore about Christianity.

But that is from the grace of God. It really matters not what situation you are in or grew up in, what matters is what God has planned for you and what His grace will allow in your circumstances. In my case, by His grace, I was saved, educated and became successful.

Respectfully,

Jean Chauvin (Jude 3).

Yea, and in your stint here last year you told everyone you were dying.

 

"We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers."Obama
Check out my poetry here on Rational Responders Like my poetry thread on Facebook under BrianJames Rational Poet also on twitter under Brianrrs37


Jean Chauvin
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Hi Brian

Hi Brian,

You remembered. I am now better by God's grace. The cancer has deceased and as of now i should live a normal life. Why Brian, were you worried about me? did i concern you?

I missed you too Brian.

What is it going to take for you and I to come to some sort of peace of friendship?

Respectfully,

Jean Chauvin (Jude 3).

A Rational Christian of Intelligence (rare)with a valid and sound justification for my epistemology and a logical refutation for those with logical fallacies and false worldviews upon their normative of thinking in retrospect to objective normative(s). This is only understood via the imago dei in which we all are.

Respectfully,

Jean Chauvin (Jude 3).


Vastet
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So you lied about that too.

So you lied about that too. Big surprise. Not.

Proud Canadian, Enlightened Atheist, Gaming God.