The New Pre-Cambrian Period

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The New Pre-Cambrian Period

Scientists have recently had to name the period that predates the Cambrian Explosion because they've been finding so many new, simpler fossils of that age, the Ediacaran:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/27/science/27creatures.html?th&emc=th

It's also providing heaps of controversial organisms and likely decades of new research material: very exciting.

The rules of English pronunciation are giving me a problem with "Ediacaran," though. Can someone from Australia help? My best guess would be "ee-dee-uh-KAIR-en," or possibly "eh-dee-ACK-er-en."

Ryan


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Dictionary.com has it as

Dictionary.com has it as going like this:

 

Ee-dee-ah-car-ran

NoMoreCrazyPeople wrote:
Never ever did I say enything about free, I said "free."

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Answers in Gene Simmons wrote:

Dictionary.com has it as going like this:

 

Ee-dee-ah-car-ran

 

Stress where?


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Well, dictionary.com give a

Well, dictionary.com give a fairly generic pronunciation that does not say how any specific population will render a word. I did some googling though and came up with this:

 

Quote:
The name Ediacara - pronounced /idiAkr@/ with stress on the first 'a' (and

even occasionally spellt without the middle 'a') has nothing in it that
corresponds to any word for water in any of the local languages ('kawi' in
most; 'awi' in Adnyamathanha). In fact the Ediacran Hills and the old mining
township of Ediacra (first named in 1891) are somewhat west of the Flinders
Ranges proper - actually in Kuyani country. Tradition has it that the name
meant "granite plain", but, since there appears to be no igneous rock in the
area, this could well refer to the hardness of the ground, rather than to
its geological composition. I have consulted John McEntee (the world's
greatest living authority on Flinders Ranges languages!) and his best guess
is that the name is a corruption of Kuyani 'yartakara', from 'yarta'
(=ground) + 'takara' (= claypan). Certainly the first vowel of 'yarta' would
be very raised in this environment (between a palatal and a retroflex) and
could become very 'i'-like.

So that's our story here in South Australia (and we're sticking to it -
until something more plausible turns up!)

 

http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0405&L=australian-linguistics-l&D=1&P=264

 

Since this guy is supposed to be a speech pathologist with the local university for the area, I am willing to go with what he said.

NoMoreCrazyPeople wrote:
Never ever did I say enything about free, I said "free."

=


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Answers in Gene Simmons

Answers in Gene Simmons wrote:

Well, dictionary.com give a fairly generic pronunciation that does not say how any specific population will render a word. I did some googling though and came up with this:

 

Quote:
The name Ediacara - pronounced /idiAkr@/ with stress on the first 'a' (and

even occasionally spellt without the middle 'a') has nothing in it that
corresponds to any word for water in any of the local languages ('kawi' in
most; 'awi' in Adnyamathanha). In fact the Ediacran Hills and the old mining
township of Ediacra (first named in 1891) are somewhat west of the Flinders
Ranges proper - actually in Kuyani country. Tradition has it that the name
meant "granite plain", but, since there appears to be no igneous rock in the
area, this could well refer to the hardness of the ground, rather than to
its geological composition. I have consulted John McEntee (the world's
greatest living authority on Flinders Ranges languages!) and his best guess
is that the name is a corruption of Kuyani 'yartakara', from 'yarta'
(=ground) + 'takara' (= claypan). Certainly the first vowel of 'yarta' would
be very raised in this environment (between a palatal and a retroflex) and
could become very 'i'-like.

So that's our story here in South Australia (and we're sticking to it -
until something more plausible turns up!)

 

http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0405&L=australian-linguistics-l&D=1&P=264

 

Since this guy is supposed to be a speech pathologist with the local university for the area, I am willing to go with what he said.

 

Okay, I've got it now. Thanks. Approaching the "i" like a "y" helps quite a bit.

I'm not convinced I'll ever need to bring this up in a conversation, but if I do, I don't want to sound like an idiot...