A little look at evolution from the POV of taxonomy.

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A little look at evolution from the POV of taxonomy.

And a slap slap slap to a few creationists.

 

 


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Woah, that guy is a machine

Woah, that guy is a machine gun.


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So much information, so

So much information, so fast... This video could have easily been twice as long just from him talking slower. Interesting though I never knew there there were still "Pre-evolution" organisms living. No one by any chance has more information on them or why a more detailed explanation as how they proved that we are unrelated to them, do they?


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Well stosis, a quick

Well stosis, a quick answer can be done but that would be like the quick presentation. However, I will flesh the matter out enough to lead to more questions.

 

The first thing that you need to know is the concept of gradualism. There are no clear dividing lines between condition A and condition B.

 

So you may hear of “abiogenesis” which refers to the formation of life from non-life. Even that did not happen quickly. So there is no clear line between the two.

 

When the earth had cooled enough for a few simple compounds to form, such as water, ammonia and methane, they began to form more complicated molecules. And those molecules formed ever more complicated molecules.

 

Eventually (somewhere in the range of about 1.5 billion years ago, there were primitive cells known as prokaryotes. They are life by any reasonable definition. They exist as cells with cellular structures such as a wall to keep the stuff inside protected and flagellum to move around. However, they were not much past that. They did not have much internal structure, such as a nucleus. The DNA just floated around inside.

 

As in the video, they had the ability to swap bits of DNA from one cell to another. And yes, they are still with us today. One good place to find them in is the oxygen poor crap at the bottom of ponds. You see, for the most part, oxygen is really bad for them.

 

Eventually, more complicated cells for with more defined internal structures. They were kind of similar to early plants even though they were still single cells. Once they got moving in a big way, they started pumping oxygen into the environment and set the stage for everything that comes later.

 

These cells are called eukaryotes because of the internal structures. They have a well defined nucleus and the other structures to provide energy for cells, build proteins and so forth. All plants and animals are eukayrotes.

 

Since they have the well defined nucleus, they can go from haphazard exchange of DNA to a more well determined system where the structures can be exchanged from one cell to another. In some sense, the eukaryotes invented sex.

 

Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes can exist as single cell organisms that are collectively known as bacteria. However, prokayrotes AFAIK simply do not form multicellular organisms due probably to the lack of sophistication inherent in random exchange of DNA.

 

Really though, that is little better than the original presentation. However, as I say, if it encourages more questions, that can only be a good thing.

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Answers in Gene Simmons

Answers in Gene Simmons wrote:

Well stosis, a quick answer can be done but that would be like the quick presentation. However, I will flesh the matter out enough to lead to more questions.

 

The first thing that you need to know is the concept of gradualism. There are no clear dividing lines between condition A and condition B.

 

So you may hear of “abiogenesis” which refers to the formation of life from non-life. Even that did not happen quickly. So there is no clear line between the two.

 

When the earth had cooled enough for a few simple compounds to form, such as water, ammonia and methane, they began to form more complicated molecules. And those molecules formed ever more complicated molecules.

 

Eventually (somewhere in the range of about 1.5 billion years ago, there were primitive cells known as prokaryotes. They are life by any reasonable definition. They exist as cells with cellular structures such as a wall to keep the stuff inside protected and flagellum to move around. However, they were not much past that. They did not have much internal structure, such as a nucleus. The DNA just floated around inside.

 

As in the video, they had the ability to swap bits of DNA from one cell to another. And yes, they are still with us today. One good place to find them in is the oxygen poor crap at the bottom of ponds. You see, for the most part, oxygen is really bad for them.

 

Eventually, more complicated cells for with more defined internal structures. They were kind of similar to early plants even though they were still single cells. Once they got moving in a big way, they started pumping oxygen into the environment and set the stage for everything that comes later.

 

These cells are called eukaryotes because of the internal structures. They have a well defined nucleus and the other structures to provide energy for cells, build proteins and so forth. All plants and animals are eukayrotes.

 

Since they have the well defined nucleus, they can go from haphazard exchange of DNA to a more well determined system where the structures can be exchanged from one cell to another. In some sense, the eukaryotes invented sex.

 

Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes can exist as single cell organisms that are collectively known as bacteria. However, prokayrotes AFAIK simply do not form multicellular organisms due probably to the lack of sophistication inherent in random exchange of DNA.

 

Really though, that is little better than the original presentation. However, as I say, if it encourages more questions, that can only be a good thing.

 

Thanks a lot for the information and the time it took you to write it. I do think that you did a much better job explaining it than the video, or at least it was much more understandable at reading pace. I assume that prokaryotes do not have mitochondira (I have heard that mitochondria were once organisms on their own that made their way into other cells in a symbiotic relationship), is this true?


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Small video on abiogenesis

Small video on abiogenesis basics, starts off a little slow and elementary.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6QYDdgP9eg&feature=channel_page