"An Evangelical Manifesto"

Renee Obsidianwords
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"An Evangelical Manifesto"

I think there is more to this story, I have begun looking a few things up....I just wanted to get it out there for all of you guys to read and add your thoughts.

From what I pull from the article, there is a movement to bring christian leaders together to tackle common political issues and stop being so divided amongst their group. The group that developed the manifesto seems to want to create a focused attack on issues amongst evangelicals and feel that the word itself needs to be considered;

"...theologicans and Christian leaders involved are seeking to "go back to the root theological meaning of the term evangelical."

Apparently a main player in the evangelical movement hasn't signed on in acceptance of this manifesto;

"James Dobson, the influential founder of Focus on the Family, a Christian group in Colorado Springs, Colo., did not sign the document"

I found this from 2006 that mentions Dobson again:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/16/weekinreview/16luo.html

 

 

Evangelicals say faith is now too political

Conservative Christian leaders who believe the word "evangelical" has lost its religious meaning plan to release a starkly self-critical document saying the movement has become too political and has diminished the Gospel through its approach to the culture wars.

The statement, called "An Evangelical Manifesto," condemns Christians on the right and left for "using faith" to express political views without regard to the truth of the Bible, according to a draft of the document obtained Friday by The Associated Press.

"That way faith loses its independence, Christians become `useful idiots' for one political party or another, and the Christian faith becomes an ideology," according to the draft.

The declaration, scheduled to be released Wednesday in Washington, encourages Christians to be politically engaged and uphold teachings such as traditional marriage. But the drafters say evangelicals have often expressed "truth without love," helping create a backlash against religion during a "generation of culture warring."

"All too often we have attacked the evils and injustices of others," they wrote, "while we have condoned our own sins." They argue, "we must reform our own behavior."

The document is the latest chapter in the debate among conservative Christians about their role in public life. Most veteran leaders believe the focus should remain on abortion and marriage, while other evangelicals — especially in the younger generation — are pushing for a broader agenda. The manifesto sides with those seeking a wide-range of concerns beyond "single-issue politics."

Among the signers of the manifesto are Os Guiness, a well-known evangelical author and speaker, and Richard Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary, a leading evangelical school in Pasadena, Calif. Organizers declined to comment until the final document is released.

They say more than 80 evangelicals have signed the statement, although only a few names have been released. A. Larry Ross, spokesman for the authors, said the theologicans and Christian leaders involved are seeking to "go back to the root theological meaning of the term evangelical."

Some champions of traditional culture war issues are not among the supporters.

Richard Land, head of the public policy arm for the Southern Baptist Convention, said through a spokeswoman that he has not seen the document and was not asked to sign it.

James Dobson, the influential founder of Focus on the Family, a Christian group in Colorado Springs, Colo., did not sign the document, said Gary Schneeberger, a Dobson spokesman. Schneeberger would not say whether Dobson had read the manifesto or had been asked to sign on.

Phil Burress, an Ohio activist who networks with national evangelical leaders, said that if high-profile evangelical leaders such as Dobson and Land don't support the document, "it's like throwing a pebble in the ocean" and will carry no weight.

But the drafters hope they can start a movement among evangelicals to reflect and act on the document. "We must find a new understanding of our place in public life," the drafters wrote.

 

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Jeffrick
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manifesto

   The longer evangelicals  feud with each other the better for the sane world.  After all it was not atheists who caught Jimmy Swaggart  and  Jim Bakker  in their vices,  it was rival holier-then-thous.

   It makes one wonder what James Dobson has realy been up to in Colorado.

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Jeffrick wrote:   The

Jeffrick wrote:

   The longer evangelicals  feud with each other the better for the sane world.  After all it was not atheists who caught Jimmy Swaggart  and  Jim Bakker  in their vices,  it was rival holier-then-thous.

   It makes one wonder what James Dobson has realy been up to in Colorado.

So how is this manifesto not political? From what I read here it seems that the manifesto proponents are against the so called 'culture wars' but are putting forward a political agenda at the same time. They aren't constitutionally allowed to have a role in politics anyway, if they do they should be taxed. Tax the bastards!


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Renee Obsidianwords

Renee Obsidianwords wrote:
there is a movement to bring christian leaders together to tackle common political issues and stop being so divided amongst their group

Quote:

Conservative Christian leaders who believe the word "evangelical" has lost its religious meaning ... condemns Christians on the right and left for "using faith" to express political views without regard to the truth of the Bible


That would be an incredable feat since the bible is full of 100's of contradictions. What the hell is biblical truth?

People who think there is something they refer to as god don't ask enough questions.


qbg
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aiia wrote:Renee

aiia wrote:

Renee Obsidianwords wrote:
there is a movement to bring christian leaders together to tackle common political issues and stop being so divided amongst their group

Quote:

Conservative Christian leaders who believe the word "evangelical" has lost its religious meaning ... condemns Christians on the right and left for "using faith" to express political views without regard to the truth of the Bible


That would be an incredable feat since the bible is full of 100's of contradictions. What the hell is biblical truth?


What ever your pastor says/what ever you make out of the few parts of the bible you read/etc.

"What right have you to condemn a murderer if you assume him necessary to "God's plan"? What logic can command the return of stolen property, or the branding of a thief, if the Almighty decreed it?"
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Chris Roberts (not verified)
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The constitution and politics

They aren't constitutionally allowed to have a role in politics anyway, if they do they should be taxed. Tax the bastards!

The constitution preserves and protects the right of all people to have a role in politics. Tax exempt organizations are not allowed to push politics as an organization. Individuals within the organization are free to do what they will as individuals. The writers of this document were not writing on behalf of their institutions but on behalf of themselves. Plus the document does not promote any particular political issue or position but calls for Evangelicals to engage in politics with a certain spirit and from a perspective that preserves the voice of all people in politics.

The Establishment clause of the constitution guarantees (1) that government will not push any religion and (2) government will not restrict religion. Tax law gives exemption to organizations and requires they remain silent/officially neutral in certain political arenas. Tax law does not remove constitutional rights from individuals.


jcgadfly
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Chris Roberts wrote:They

Chris Roberts wrote:

They aren't constitutionally allowed to have a role in politics anyway, if they do they should be taxed. Tax the bastards!

The constitution preserves and protects the right of all people to have a role in politics. Tax exempt organizations are not allowed to push politics as an organization. Individuals within the organization are free to do what they will as individuals. The writers of this document were not writing on behalf of their institutions but on behalf of themselves. Plus the document does not promote any particular political issue or position but calls for Evangelicals to engage in politics with a certain spirit and from a perspective that preserves the voice of all people in politics.

The Establishment clause of the constitution guarantees (1) that government will not push any religion and (2) government will not restrict religion. Tax law gives exemption to organizations and requires they remain silent/officially neutral in certain political arenas. Tax law does not remove constitutional rights from individuals.

I beleieve he was talking about taxing the churches, not the people in them. Last time I checked, churches were organizations not individuals.

Then again, for profit corporations are considered individuals in many legal actions so I can't say for sure anymore.

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