"Afraid of Thinking" somthing a co-worker said to me last night.

JanCham
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"Afraid of Thinking" somthing a co-worker said to me last night.

My co-worker is a fairly young man trying to get though colledge while he works with me in Security.  He told me he was reading over David Hume and also over Utilitarianism.  I was disturbed when he talked about being "Afraid of think" while reading it.  I assume he's religious and feels threatened by the secular philosophy he has to read, but being afraid... it makes sense why there are so many theists out there now.

To go beyond your limits you must first find them.


Shaitian
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wow now thats warped. how

wow now thats warped. how can u be afraid to think it just isn't fathomable!!!


Cpt_pineapple
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Everytime I try to think, my

Everytime I try to think, my brain tickles.

 

Sad 


Conor Wilson
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Shaitian wrote...

wow now thats warped. how can u be afraid to think it just isn't fathomable!!!

 

My $0.02: I'm sorry to say that I understand this attitude all too well.  If you believe that you *will* be sent to Hell for mortal sins, and that the most serious such sins include both heresy and apostasy (...which, in the considered opinion of the Church, is essentially calling God a liar...) you become very, *very* concerned about "getting it right."  And if you think you *do* have it right, you become very nervous about anything which might challenge your "correct" (read: infallible, inerrant, or prophetic, as you choose) beliefs.  This is why I can look back on my past, and remember reading about a series of head injury cases which, long story short, effectively disproved the concept of a human soul.  What did I do in response to such ideas? I shut them out of my thinking process as best I could.  That is, of course, intellectual dishonesty (and, please note, I am *not* trying to present it as if it were some kind of virtue; quite the opposite, in fact.)  But I did what I did, because I was afraid of roasting forever in Hellfire.  This, in turn may be why I literally had to see a damned-if-I-did-and-damned-if-Ididn't situation before I could have really seen the falsehood of the religion I belonged to, at the time.  This is how you get to be "afraid to think:" you begin to look upon your own thought as your own worst enemy.

 

Conor

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"Faith does not fear reason."--Pope Pius XII

"But it should!"--Me


Jacob Cordingley
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My two pence. I think we're

My two pence. I think we're all afraid to some extent of things that challenge our beliefs. Even those of us in science or secular philosophy. Of course, this is to a lesser extent than in religious folk but I think it is possible if you're really honest to associate with that fear, perhaps not to do with your beliefs about God or religion but with other beliefs you hold dear to you.


JanCham
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That fits pretty well with

That fits pretty well with my argument of modality.  It's one thing to cast off religion, it's another to get rid of those nasty little habits and concepts that came with the whole religious ideaology.  A good example is one of my roomates, he's an ex-catholic turned agnostic.  He realizes what his religion did to him mentally, but he constantly finds himself behaving and acting in the same old ways.  I think that many atheists still suffer the after effects of religon even after they shed the whole idea of faith in silly percepts.  The principle of science that finds it exciting and positive to be proven wrong is a wonderful thing, but even after we discover the joy of being wrong (and by that means find truth) we still hold onto the concept in faith that tells us to be emotionally attached to currently held ideas.

To go beyond your limits you must first find them.


Jacob Cordingley
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I don't think its just

I don't think its just religion though. We all believe in things without scientific evidence. For example in the social sphere of life we might believe someone to be trustworthy, and find it hard to accept when he is shown not to be. The drummer in my band is the Godson of the late Dr Harold Shipman, one of Britain's most infamous serial killers. He was telling me the other day that he thought Shipman was actually a good guy but couldn't comprehend why he did the things he did. Indeed Shipman had even saved his life.

Another example is my vegetarianism. I started being vegetarian when I was 5 years old when I found out what meat was. For years it was a moral thing. It wasn't till I was 18 that I decided actually there were no good moral arguments for vegetarianism and yet, more than three years on from that I'm still a vegetarian and I still find the notion of eating meat actually disgusts me, I don't care about other people doing it, I don't care that animals get killed for it, but I do believe that I will never give it up.

We all have habits and steady norms we like to fall into for our own comfort, whether they be religious beliefs, beliefs about people or lifestyle choices, we all desire to continue in our habits even when it is no good for us.


Louis_Cypher
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Evolution

Ideas and mind sets can change with time and experience to the point that long held ideas can be overthrown.

When I was a young man, I was an avid proponent of the death penalty. When I left the army, I went as far as applying for the position of Executioner in the state of Texas (no, I didn't get the job, and yes, it really was a job posting...)

Since that time, I've come to a realization that even though some individuals do forfeit their right to live due to their own actions, it is not worth the risk that one innocent person be killed, even to rid the world of the real monsters.

Question everything, yourself most of all...

LC >;-}>

 

 

Christianity: A disgusting middle eastern blood cult, based in human sacrifice, with sacraments of cannibalism and vampirism, whose highest icon is of a near naked man hanging in torment from a device of torture.


Nordmann
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JanCham wrote:My co-worker

JanCham wrote:

My co-worker is a fairly young man trying to get though colledge while he works with me in Security.  He told me he was reading over David Hume and also over Utilitarianism.  I was disturbed when he talked about being "Afraid of think" while reading it.  I assume he's religious and feels threatened by the secular philosophy he has to read, but being afraid... it makes sense why there are so many theists out there now.

 

You can tell your co-worker that whatever punishment he might imagine lies in wait for those who think, it is nothing compared to that meted out in reality to those who don't!

 

But I for one feel a certain optimism when I hear similar remarks being made by people presented with a concept they have never previously taken on board. We all know them;

"That's just too much to think about"

       or "That's beyond me"

          or even "You think too much" (and others of similar ilk).

 

What they all share is a trepidation on the part of the speaker to entertain something that has already begun to be perceived by them, and that is the reason for my optimism. In other words, even though they have encountered a concept that is alien to them, or represents a mental leap in terms of their ability to understand the world around them, they have begun to visualise it mentally or at least accept its validity as a concept. It is this that sets off the alarm bells in the religiously indoctrinated mind just as it triggers excitement in the inquiring mind - the realisation that one stands on the threshold of comprehending something other than that which one has assumed up to now.

 

The path of scientific study is paved with such moments, and the fact that these moments are intellectually challenging is indeed relished by the person whose pursuit of that study was embarked upon in the full expectation and hope of finding them. This of course is the antithesis to the religious mindset, where the same threat to previously held assumptions threatens also to force their host to abandon whole chunks of the personality that they feel they have acquired through investing belief in them.

 

But whether they are welcomed or despised these moments occur, and your co-worker is simply demonstrating (albeit in a very negative way) proof that the human mind, even despite religion's imposition of irrational fear upon it in an attempt to control it, is blissfully dogged in its determination to understand. Whether he himself will ever derive benefit from his ability to perceive things outside the parameters he has imposed on himself is anyone's guess. But you can tell him, whether he appreciates the fact or not, that his comment is actually an inspiration to the rest of us who value rational thought!

I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy