CISPA = Game Over.

Sage_Override's picture

I've been saying ever since SOPA and PIPA were taken off the docket that we will see a return in some form.  We won't know when and we won't know how, but it will be back.  A lot of people knew and we were fearing the day that a manifestation would rear it's ugly head and threaten to infiltrate our online privacy and slit it's proverbial throat.  Behold your harbinger, your ruin, your reason to seethe hatred and bid farewell to the last bastion of anonymity: CISPA has risen.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/cispa-controversy-surrounding-might-affect-173913974.html

 

We had no vote on this matter, we were not informed of it's existence and we were not alerted that it would be voted on without our consent.  Our government has pulled the carpet right out from under us AGAIN and everyone will just let it happen and act as if we still have anything regarding liberty or freedom left in this shallow husk of a country.  If SOPA and PIPA were the WMDs that we successfully diffused, then CISPA is the "Tsar Bomba" that couldn't be reached in time.

 

We'll all feel the fall out from this soon; count on it.      

 

"When the majority believes in what is false, the truth becomes a quest." - Me

Kapkao's picture

How prophetic and

How prophetic and fact-deprived. You should consider writing op-eds for The New Republic. Let's see here...

Quote:
Why is it controversial? Opponents aren't arguing against discussing cyberthreats, but they're concerned about the scope of sharing and privacy issues. Under CISPA, companies will be permitted to share information with entities such as the Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency and won't be required to protect Internet users' personal data. The shared information is supposed to be related to cyberthreats, but many opponents argue that term is too broad and offers too many exemptions to current privacy laws.

• How does CISPA differ from SOPA? CISPA has been dubbed "the new SOPA," in reference to the Stop Online Piracy Act, a bill designed to curb copyright infringement by restricting sites that host pirated content. Congressional action on SOPA was postponed Jan. 20 after fierce protests from technology companies and others. SOPA centered around piracy, while CISPA is about cybersecurity. And while SOPA cracked down on domestic sites, CISPA is focused on overseas entities. Constitutional rights advocates, civil liberties groups and others oppose both bills. Unlike with SOPA, many tech companies, such as Facebook and Microsoft, support CISPA. The bill has already advanced in one chamber of Congress with a majority of support after amendments were added to define cyberthreats.

Who opposes and who supports CISPA?

Against: The American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups such as the Sunlight Foundation, the American Library Association and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are staunchly opposed to CISPA as a potential threat to Americans' constitutional rights. The White House on Wednesday threatened to veto the bill in part over privacy issues and has backed a competing cybersecurity bill offered in the Senate. A majority of House Democrats and 28 Republicans voted against the bill Thursday due to privacy issues and other factors. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas voted no on the bill, saying on Monday that it would create a "Big Brother" culture.

For: Many companies and groups including Facebook, AT&T, Intel, Microsoft, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the conservative Heritage Foundation and tech associations back CISPA as an effective way to combat overseas cyberthreats. Select members of Congress support CISPA for the same reason.

• What is the future of CISPA? Don't expect the Democratic-controlled Senate to rush to pass CISPA after the White House's veto threat. In addition to the president's opposition, CISPA must now compete with the Senate's own cybersecurity legislation.

Another words, "get back to us in November. Then we'll have something to talk about."

Gloom and doom postponed. I always enjoy these 'civil liberties' groups' preference towards hyperbole and histrionics, however.

Or something.

 

“A meritocratic society is one in which inequalities of wealth and social position solely reflect the unequal distribution of merit or skills amongst human beings, or are based upon factors beyond human control, for example luck or chance. Such a society is socially just because individuals are judged not by their gender, the colour of their skin or their religion, but according to their talents and willingness to work, or on what Martin Luther King called 'the content of their character'. By extension, social equality is unjust because it treats unequal individuals equally.” "Political Ideologies" by Andrew Heywood (2003)

Sage_Override's picture

 Quote:kapkao wrote: How

 

Quote:
kapkao wrote: How prophetic and fact-deprived. You should consider writing op-eds for The New Republic. Let's see here...

Another words, "get back to us in November. Then we'll have something to talk about."  Gloom and doom postponed.  I always enjoy these 'civil liberties' groups' preference towards hyperbole and histrionics, however.  Or something.

 

"Another" words, eh?  Not only that, but let it stand out in giant, bold lettering for everyone to see how full of fail that is.  Well done, fool.

 

In essence, what you've done is just let loose one more lame musing from the peanut gallery that is you.  Let me just reach into my "trunk of dismissals" here...one second...ah!  Yes, this should do nicely:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"When the majority believes in what is false, the truth becomes a quest." - Me

Kapkao's picture

haha u funny nigga

“A meritocratic society is one in which inequalities of wealth and social position solely reflect the unequal distribution of merit or skills amongst human beings, or are based upon factors beyond human control, for example luck or chance. Such a society is socially just because individuals are judged not by their gender, the colour of their skin or their religion, but according to their talents and willingness to work, or on what Martin Luther King called 'the content of their character'. By extension, social equality is unjust because it treats unequal individuals equally.” "Political Ideologies" by Andrew Heywood (2003)